Global Environmental Risk

By Jeanne X. Kasperson; Roger Kasperson | Go to book overview

4
Global risk, uncertainty,
and ignorance
Silvio O. Funtowicz and Jerome R. Ravetz

Science evolves as it responds to its leading challenges as they change through history. The problems of global environmental risk, along with those of equity among peoples, present the greatest collective task now facing humanity. In response, new styles of scientific activity are already under development. Traditional oppositions, such as those among natural-science disciplines and between the so-called “hard” and “soft” sciences, are being overcome. The reductionist, analytical world view that divides systems into ever-smaller elements, studied by ever-more esoteric specialties, is giving way to a systemic, synthetic, and humanistic approach. The recognition of real natural systems as complex and dynamic entails moving to a science based on unpredictability, incomplete control, and plural legitimate perspectives.

We are now witnessing a growing awareness among all those concerned with global risks that no single cultural tradition, no matter how successful in the past, can supply all the solutions for the problems of the planet. Forms of knowing other than those fostered by modern Western civilization are also relevant for an exploratory problem-solving dialogue. Moreover, we should harbour no pretence of an Olympian detachment from the fate of our own species and that of our neighbours or, indeed, from the special problems of those rendered more vulnerable to environmental change owing to nationality, race, class, gender, or disability. Owing to the new recognition of linkage among regions and interdependency among peoples, as chapters 1 and 7 suggest, issues of equity be

-173-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Global Environmental Risk
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 574

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.