Major Black American Writers through the Harlem Renaissance

By Harold Bloom | Go to book overview

Countee Cullen
1903-1946

COUNTEE CULLEN was born Countee Leroy Porter on May 30, 1903. He was probably born in Louisville, Kentucky, although both New York City and Baltimore have been cited as his birthplace. Orphaned in childhood, he was raised by a Mrs. Porter, who was probably his grandmother. In his teens he was adopted by African Methodist Episcopal Church minister Frederick Asbury Cullen and his wife Carolyn, who encouraged Countee to write. Cullen's poetry was already seeing regular publication by the time he graduated from New York University in 1925. His first book, Color, appeared that same year; Cullen won the Harmon Gold Award and critical praise for his Keatsian verse and his frank depiction of racial prejudice.

Cullen received an M.A. from Harvard in 1926, then became assistant editor of the National Urban League journal Opportunity. In 1927 he published the acclaimed Copper Sun and The Ballad of the Brown Girl, and edited Caroling Dusk, a historic anthology of work by black poets. The following year he married Yolande Du Bois, daughter of W. E. B. Du Bois, and traveled to Paris on a Guggenheim Fellowship. Yolande filed for divorce before he returned; their relationship inspired the tortured love poetry of The Black Christ and Other Poems (1929).

Back in the United States, Cullen published a novel of life in Harlem, One Way to Heaven (1932), and a verse adaptation of Euripides' Medea (1935). From 1932 to 1945 Cullen settled into a teaching position at a junior high school in New York City. In 1940 he married Ida Mae Roberson and published a children's book of verse entitled The Lost Zoo (A Rhyme for the Young, but Not Too Young), sharing the bylines with his pet, Christopher Cat. Two years later he published a prose work for children, My Lives and How I Lost Them (1942), which purported to be Christopher's autobiography. Cullen authored and coauthored a number of plays, most of which were not published; his own selection of his best poems was published posthumously as On These I Stand: An Anthology of the Best Poems of Countee Cullen (1947). Countee Cullen died on January 9, 1946. Gerald Early has

-17-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Major Black American Writers through the Harlem Renaissance
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Major Black American Writers - Through the Harlem Renaissance *
  • Contents *
  • User's Guide vi
  • The Life of the Author vii
  • Introduction xi
  • Charles W. Chesnutt 1858-1932 1
  • Countee Cullen 1903-1946 17
  • Frederick Douglass 1818-1895 34
  • W. E. B. Du Bois 1868-1963 49
  • Paul Laurence Dunbar 1872-1906 68
  • Langston Hughes 1902-1967 85
  • Zora Neale Hurston C. 1891-1960 102
  • James Weldon Johnson 1871-1938 119
  • Claude Mckay 1890-1948 136
  • Jean Toomer 1894-1967 153
  • Richard Wright 1908-1960 170
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 187

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.