Implications and Policy Options of California's Reliance on Natural Gas

By Mark A. Bernstein; Paul D. Holtberg et al. | Go to book overview

2
Natural Gas Demand Projections and
Profiles

First, we develop a range of natural gas growth estimates for California. A plausible range for growth, not a precise projection, is needed to investigate the adequacy of the gas supply and transportation infrastructure and identify potential policy problems and solutions. Much of the projected natural gas demand growth is for electricity generation, which has a different seasonal load profile from those of the residential, commercial, and industrial sectors. The difference in seasonal load has significant implications for the natural gas delivery infrastructure.


Projected Natural Gas Demand in California,
2002 to 2010

From 1990 to 1999, natural gas demand in California grew more rapidly (2.2 percent per year) than the national average (1.9 percent per year). Increased demand for natural gas for electric power generation (both utility and non-utility sources) was one of the primary causes. Figure 2.1 illustrates that from 1996 to 2000, annual natural gas demand for electricity generation grew from approximately 570 billion cubic feet to almost 950 billion cubic feet. This strong growth was at least partially driven by weather-related factors, including warm summers and the ongoing drought in the Pacific Northwest that reduced hydroelectric capacity. Demand for power generation is expected to be the source of much of the gas demand growth in California over the next decade because of the construction of an unprecedented amount of new central station gas-fired generating capacity.

Two projections were used to estimate the range of gas demand growth. The 2001 Edition of the GRI Baseline Projection (GRI Baseline) was used to establish the upper range of the gas demand; and the 2001 EIA Annual Energy Outlook (AEO) (EIA 2001c), which assumes that California continues to meet much of its electricity demand with imports, was used to establish the lower range of the gas demand. The CEC's projection of gas demand (CEC 2001a) falls within this range. The projected range is presented in Figure 2.2.

Both the GRI Baseline and AEO projections are based on highly detailed econometric and engineering models and on project demand by sector (e.g.,

-6-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Implications and Policy Options of California's Reliance on Natural Gas
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page *
  • Preface iii
  • Contents v
  • Figures vii
  • Tables ix
  • Summary xi
  • Acknowledgments xv
  • Acronyms xvii
  • 1 - Introduction 1
  • 2 - Natural Gas Demand Projections and Profiles 6
  • 3 - California's Natural Gas Supply 13
  • 4 - Pipeline Capacity 19
  • 5 - Natural Gas Public Policy Choices for California 28
  • 6 - Conclusions 36
  • References 39
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 41

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.