Spirits Captured in Stone: Shamanism and Traditional Medicine among the Taman of Borneo

By Jay H. Bernstein | Go to book overview

6

The Work and
Equipment of the Balien

Having undergone initiation in the menyarung ceremony, the novice balien is empowered to heal patients in the balien's ceremonies. In all, there are seven balien ceremonies, including the menyarung ceremony. 1 These are clearly ranked in complexity and gravity. The balien learns the simpler treatments first and gradually becomes accomplished in the more advanced procedures. The balien's apprehension and use of spirits in these ceremonies require distinctive cognitive modes as well as special equipment and accoutrements. In analyzing the ceremonies in detail, this chapter discusses time outlays, payments, material culture (equipment, accoutrements, and provisions), narrative rhetoric, and discourse.


The Hierarchy of Balien Techniques

Bubut, the first ceremony, comprises the first level of therapy. In it, the balien rubs over the patient's body stones dipped into a crushed medicinal plant, magically extracting the disease as if through magnetism. Mangait, the next level, is the location of the patient's lost soul by the balien, who offers a replica of it to the spirits, and instructs the patient's family where the soul has been taken so that another replica can be exchanged for the patient's soul. In this ceremony the balien uses stones that take him or her on a trip via waterways to disused swidden fields, graveyards, fig trees, ditches, or other "haunted" places to find the lost soul. In malai, the balien goes to the spot where the patient's soul has been located, snatches it from the spirit that has taken it, and brings it back to the patient, reinserting it into the fontanel of the head. Menindoani, the next level, is an advanced variation of mangait, made more difficult by the fact that the balien's soul must "fly" in the air and reach the land of the dead to catch the additional souls that have strayed too far to be caught through mangait. In tabak buse, baliens beat drums to communicate with the spirits. In mengadengi, spirits

-109-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Spirits Captured in Stone: Shamanism and Traditional Medicine among the Taman of Borneo
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 209

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.