Spirits Captured in Stone: Shamanism and Traditional Medicine among the Taman of Borneo

By Jay H. Bernstein | Go to book overview

Appendix A:

Glossary

This is a glossary of Taman and other words relevant to this book. The reader is referred to Diposiswoyo 1985, Hudson 1970, King 1976b, and King 1985 for more complete word lists. Language in parentheses following a term indicates that the term is not a Taman word. However, many Taman words are also accepted in other languages and in some cases borrowed from them.

Adat. Custom, customary law.
Angin (Malay). Wind.
Ansan. Fleck, speck, tiny pebble.
Antu. Ghost.
Antumelet. Herpes.
Apais. Ill, sick.
Apuan. Shortness of breath, bronchial asthma, or other upper respiratory tract ill-
ness.
Badet. See Najam.
Badi
(Malay). Revenge in the form of illness from a spirit for harming or violating
it.
Badi api. Fire badi.
Badi kucing (alt. badi pusa'). Cat badi.
Badi lumantik (alt. badi semadak). Black-ant badi.
Badi turos (alt. badi pancak). Stake badi.
Bajoak. Gastroenteritis.
Baju kalawat. Blouse worn by the balien when performing ceremonies.
Bala buloh. Bundle of sixty twigs used as an offering to the balien goddess Piang
Siunsun Amas in menindoani, mengadengi,
and menyarung ceremonies. Made
out of bamboo in menindoani ceremony and out of tabas pusa' (Clerodendrum)
for use in the other ceremonies. Literal translation: Split bamboo.
Balasan. Revenge. For example, dabalas jalu, revenge by a being.
Balien. Shaman.

-173-

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