Food for Our Grandmothers: Writings by Arab-American and Arab-Canadian Feminists

By Joanna Kadi | Go to book overview

Acknowledgments

Special thanks to Jan Binder. I would not be where I am today without her incredible love, support, and encouragement. This book is much better because of the help she provided with the day-to-day work involved in such a project.

I am very grateful for the work of my editor at South End Press, Dionne Brooks, and the South End collective in general. I also want to acknowledge my appreciation of the initial support of this project that came from Barbara Smith and Kitchen Table: Women of Color Press.

Throughout the process of editing this book, I've received so much emotional support and sustenance, as well as help with political and artistic decisions. Thanks to all of these wonderful people: Lisa Albrecht, Marti Farha Ammar, Sue Baker, Lisa Bergin, Katy Gray Brown, Katie Cannon, Elizabeth Clare, Becky Conekin, Andrea Densham, Jim Fairhart, Gio Guzzi, Sheri Hostetler, Marjorie Huebner, Myke Johnson, Judith Katz, J.A. Khawaja, Karen Luks, Lisa Suhair Majaj, Dan McMullin, Charlotte and Joseph Michael, Jeff Nygaard, Juliana Pegues, Elissa Raffa, Susan Raffo, Merri Rose, Linda Simon, Linda Suzuki, Joann Vasconcellos, Lynne Whitney, and Beth Zemsky.

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