Food for Our Grandmothers: Writings by Arab-American and Arab-Canadian Feminists

By Joanna Kadi | Go to book overview
Save to active project

Unpicked Fruits

BARBARA NIMRI AZIZ

Muna, her son Mazin, and I are moving toward that beautiful occupied land, South Lebanon. We follow a potholed and dirty coastal road south in flight from our crowded West Beirut apartment.

A November day. Olive-harvest time in the hills. The sky is clear. Other young families pour out of the noisy city. Some drive northward, speeding along the coast. Then, as if slipping to a secret rendevous, their cars dart into an unmarked road and disappear into the hills—to their family homes. There they will pick olives and stroll with their cousins along the quiet lanes of their childhood.

I wait to hear my companion's comments about the recent Lebanese election, the first in such a long time; or will she discuss the Israeli shelling in the south? Nearby, less than an hour's drive away, fighting has erupted. Everyone knows; it arrives like a change in the weather—predictable and unwelcome. It destroys, then subsides. Its return is inevitable. All along that line that divides "free Lebanon" from the Israeli-occupied south, ambushes and airstrikes explode houses and skulls.

No comments are volunteered about the battles. It is pointless to discuss them. Why let them disrupt our weekend flow into family retreats where the old, silvery olive trees are heavy with their fruit?

To the hills. Beirut apartment dwellers are desperate for some respite in their countryside. They are not like other city people who moved from declining villages to become urbanites. All Lebanese remain part rural; their childhood homes are not places left behind; they keep them and make them modern and call them home. They risk venturing into these battle zones, especially at olive-harvest time. Besides, today's air-strikes are mild compared to the civil war years ago and the horrifying invasion in the burning summer of 1982. These shellings are inevitable, just as local resistance operations against the occupation forces are part of the pattern of life in the South.

-56-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
Loading One moment ...
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Food for Our Grandmothers: Writings by Arab-American and Arab-Canadian Feminists
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

While we understand printed pages are helpful to our users, this limitation is necessary to help protect our publishers' copyrighted material and prevent its unlawful distribution. We are sorry for any inconvenience.
Full screen
/ 291

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.

Are you sure you want to delete this highlight?