Food for Our Grandmothers: Writings by Arab-American and Arab-Canadian Feminists

By Joanna Kadi | Go to book overview

Artist

HAPPY/L. A. HYDER

I believe I always wanted to be an artist, even before I knew the words for it. Sometimes I wonder how I kept, or even found, that image of myself. Growing up in my working-class, ethnically Eastern European and Mediterranean neighborhood did not offer that option. At the age of forty-six, known as an artist and director of an arts organization of my own making, I am grateful I did.

My years in college (as an English major) coincided with the realization of pop art and psychedelic art. Both were easy to grasp, concerned with the present moment, often political, and exciting to see. "Finding" women artists gave me another sense of my possibilities as an artist and fostered my feminist streak even before I could recognize or articulate it. The mystique of making art surrounded me as the accessibility of pop art made my mouth water.

I moved to San Francisco in 1969 and circumstances were such that within a year I had a 35 millimeter camera in my hands— instantly calling myself a photographer and jumping into it. Printing a picture from film I had taken was the most exciting thing I could imagine.

Photography allows me to record what I see and have it come alive in the richness of black and white. My sense of a good photograph is based on those which first excited me. They came from Life magazine and such artists as Margaret Bourke-White and Eugene Smith, both masters at their craft and innovators in photography.

I combined my art with my emerging activism in the 1980s as a founding member of Vida Gallery in the San Francisco Women's Building and became part of a world populated with feminist activists. Vida Gallery featured the work of international women artists from 1981 to 1986; not a radical concept although often taken as one.

It was during these years I first began using art to express my Arabness. It opened another part of myself as I used my strongest

-241-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Food for Our Grandmothers: Writings by Arab-American and Arab-Canadian Feminists
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 291

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.