Food for Our Grandmothers: Writings by Arab-American and Arab-Canadian Feminists

By Joanna Kadi | Go to book overview
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About the Contributors

Azizah al-Hibri was born and educated in Beirut, Lebanon. She came to the United States in 1966 to pursue her graduate studies, and became a citizen many years later. She is presently a professor of law at the University of Richmond Law School. She has published many articles in feminist theory and is founding editor of Hypatia.

Lamea Abbas Amara is an Iraqi poet who has pursued a distinguished literary and diplomatic career. Seven collections of her poetry have been published in Arabic. She currently lives in La Mesa, California, where she is the editor of Mandaee, a bilingual cultural magazine.

Marti Farha Ammar has lectured widely on the current political situation in the Middle East, and has completed extensive studies of Arabic and translation. A world traveler and political activist, she is president of Save Lebanon, Inc., which provides humanitarian relief for Palestinian and Lebanese victims of the Lebanese civil war.

Barbara Nimri Aziz is a New York-based anthropologist and journalist who regularly writes from the Middle East. She is completing a book on the Arab experience of the war against Iraq. She is also producer and host of Tahrir: Voices of the Arab World, broadcast over Pacifica-WBAI radio in New York.

Martha Ani Boudakian is an activist and aspiring midwife. She is co-founder of an organization of Armenian feminists that may choose not to name itself. She currently lives in Boston and plans to return to the woods someday.

Ellen Mansoor Collier is a Houston-based freelance writer and editor who writes for a variety of magazines. A former magazine editor, she has a Bachelor of Journalism degree from the University of Texas at Austin.

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Food for Our Grandmothers: Writings by Arab-American and Arab-Canadian Feminists
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