Death, Gender, and Ethnicity

By David Field; Jenny Hockey et al. | Go to book overview

Notes on contributors

Pamela Dawson is Bromley Hospital’s bereavement co-ordinator. She previously worked as a freelance bereavement consultant and is interested in the role of self-help in bereavement.

David Field is now Lecturer in Sociology at the University of Plymouth having previously been at the Universities of Ulster and Leicester. He has been working in the sociology of death and dying since 1979 and has written on nursing the dying, education for terminal care and various aspects of hospice care. He is the author of Nursing the Dying (Routledge, 1989).

Yasmin Gunaratnam is presently a research student at the London School of Economics. She has been involved in research and community development work around equal opportunities issues since 1986 and has published work for the King’s Fund Centre on social care and health service development.

Elizabeth Hallam is an anthropologist lecturing in the Cultural History Group at the University of Aberdeen. Her research addresses historical anthropology, gender and cultural representations in Britain and Europe.

Jenny Hockey is an anthropologist lecturing in Health Studies in the Department of Social Policy at the University of Hull. She is author of Experiences of Death: An Anthropological Account (University of Edinburgh Press 1990) and, with A. James, Growing Up and Growing Old. Ageing and Dependency in the Life Course (Sage 1993).

Gerdien Jonker is a historian of religion at the University of Groningen, Holland, and is a stipendiate within the field of religious anthropology of the Berlin Science Council. She has published widely on the topic of burial. Her present research concentrates on burial practices and forms of social memory in migrant communities.

-viii-

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Death, Gender, and Ethnicity
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Contents vii
  • Notes on Contributors viii
  • Introduction xi
  • Chapter 1 - Making Sense of Difference 1
  • Chapter 2 - Death at the Beginning of Life 29
  • Chapter 3 - ‘shoring Up the Walls of Heartache’ 52
  • Chapter 4 - Masculinity and Loss 76
  • Chapter 5 - Women in Grief 89
  • Chapter 6 - Death and the Transformation of Gender in Image and Text 108
  • Chapter 7 - Beauty and the Beast 124
  • Chapter 8 - Absent Minorities? 142
  • Chapter 9 - Culture is Not Enough 166
  • Chapter 10 - Death, Gender and Memory 187
  • Chapter 11 - Death and Difference 202
  • Index 222
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