The Archaeology Coursebook: An Introduction to Study Skills, Topics and Methods

By Jim Grant; Sam Gorin et al. | Go to book overview

Introduction
The Archaeology Coursebook is a guide for students studying archaeology for the first time. It is not another introduction to archaeology, neither is it a specialist guide to archaeological methods. There are a fantastic array of books and websites already available which fulfil these functions. The aim of this book is to get you started and help you succeed in your academic study. It does this by:
■ providing brief introductions to the most commonly examined archaeological methods, concepts and themes. Whole books have been written on the meanings of particular terms and there may not be consensus on their use. We will concentrate on providing you with working definitions and examples rather than debating meaning
■ explaining how to interpret the sort of archaeological material you may meet in examinations
■ showing you how to succeed with different types of assignments and examination questions
■ providing brief, relevant case studies which you can use in your own work
■ providing links to easily accessible sources including internet sites.

As authors we are all teachers and examiners of archaeology with long experience of successfully preparing students for GCSE, A Level, Access and HE programmes. We were advised at all stages of the developing project on what was needed by many teachers, lecturers and students from schools, colleges and universities.

This book is designed as a handbook. That is, it will be of use to you at every stage of your course, from getting to grips with terminology to producing your major study. The structure of the book loosely follows the AS and A2 Level Archaeology courses studied by students in England and Wales. However, it is intended to be relevant and useful for all students studying the subject from GCSE up to first-year undergraduate level. If it equips you to produce pass-level essays and to understand what is being discussed in lectures and seminars it will have done its job. You will, of course, need other sources too. At A level and first year undergraduate level you will need case studies and to look at examples of fieldwork reports. From year 2 undergraduate level you will need greater depth of material. However, by then you will know everything that is in this book!

We have organised the book into three broad sections:

-xxv-

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The Archaeology Coursebook: An Introduction to Study Skills, Topics and Methods
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Brief Contents v
  • Contents vii
  • Figures xix
  • Index of Skills xxii
  • Acknowledgements xxiii
  • Illustration Acknowledgements xxiv
  • Introduction xxv
  • Part One - Understanding Archaeological Resources 1
  • Chapter 1 3
  • Chapter 2 25
  • Chapter 3 58
  • Chapter 4 80
  • Chapter 5 93
  • Chapter 6 105
  • Chapter 7 120
  • Part Two - Studying Themes in Archaeology 135
  • Chapter 8 137
  • Chapter 9 165
  • Chapter 10 196
  • Chapter 11 236
  • Part Three - Examination Success and Beyond 259
  • Chapter 12 261
  • Chapter 13 283
  • Chapter 14 - Where to Next? 296
  • Chapter 15 - Finding the Best Information 301
  • Appendix 305
  • Glossary of Terms and Abbreviations 307
  • Bibliography 315
  • Index 319
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