The Archaeology Coursebook: An Introduction to Study Skills, Topics and Methods

By Jim Grant; Sam Gorin et al. | Go to book overview

Chapter 15

Finding the Best Information
There are so many excellent sites, museums and written and electronic resources available to archaeology students that we can only list a fraction of those available. Since selection has to be subjective we have included those resources that we have found most useful and which our students have made most use of. Although we have tried to provide a good range within it, our choice is clearly biased towards our own interests. Another person’s list would undoubtedly look very different. Other sources, which provide additional depth on topics contained in the text, are listed in the bibliography.
TWENTY VERY USEFUL BOOKS
We have divided this section into four. The focus is largely on Britain and Europe and full details of each text are in the bibliography. Make sure your school or college buys a copy of these books.
General texts
Ashmore, W. and Sharer, R. (1995) Discovering our Past. A good text for the visual reader, with diagrams well used to illustrate methods and thinking.
Fagin, B. (1994) In the Beginning. A detailed introduction to archaeology from an American perspective.
Greene, K. (1995) Archaeology: An introduction. This has good coverage of reconnaissance, excavation and post-excavation techniques. There is a very useful web link to case studies at http://www.staff.ncl.ac.uk/kevin.greene/wintro/
Orme, B. (1981) Anthropology for Archaeologists. A great little text for getting you to think outside European assumptions.
Renfrew, C. and Bahn, P. (1991) Archaeology: Theories, methods and practice. This has become the encyclopadia of cases studies for a generation of archaeology students.

Archaeological sources and methods
Coles, J. and Lawson, A. (eds) (1987) European Wetlands in Prehistory. Provides an excellent insight into differential preservation and the value of wet sites.
Drewett, P. (1999) Field Archaeology. For detailed coverage and clear explanations of methods.

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