Controversy and Coalition: The New Feminist Movement across Three Decades of Change

By Myra Marx Ferree; Beth B. Hess | Go to book overview

The Authors

Myra Marx Ferree, professor of sociology and women’s studies at the University of Connecticut, has been interested in feminism since she read Millett’s Sexual Politics as an undergraduate. Her Ph.D. dissertation (Harvard, 1976) was on working-class women’s responses to feminism. Her research since then has concentrated on the micropolitics of gender (the division of labor, power, satisfaction, and perceived equity in the household), public opinion on women’s issues (attitudes toward a woman for president, race differences in abortion attitudes, and gender beliefs of Cuban immigrant women), and comparative feminism. Her studies of the women’s movement include intensive research on the development of feminism in West Germany, including the difficulties it has faced as the country has recently expanded to encompass the former German Democratic Republic. She is the coeditor, with Patricia Yancey Martin, of an overview of American feminist organizations (Feminist Organizations: Harvest of the New Women’s Movement, 1994) and with Beth Hess of a handbook of feminist social science research (Analyzing Gender, 1987). She is currently beginning work on a collaborative project on abortion discourse in the mass media in the United States and Germany. Professor Ferree is past chair of both the Section on Sex and Gender and the Section on Collective Behavior and Social Movements of the American Sociological Association.

Beth B. Hess, professor of sociology at County College of Morris, has been interested in feminism since she read Millett’s Sexual Politics as a young wife and mother in suburban New Jersey. Having graduated from Radcliffe College in 1950, she returned to academe in 1963, earn-

-277-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Controversy and Coalition: The New Feminist Movement across Three Decades of Change
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 278

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.