Human Resource Management in Developing Countries

By Pawan S. Budhwar; Yaw A. Debrah | Go to book overview

Foreword

The importance of managing human resources has been growing over the past twenty years, both in academia and in practice. As a consequence, there has been a great deal written on the topic. In addition, new avenues of investigation have developed, including strategic human resource management and international human resource management. All this has been supported and encouraged by the introduction of several new journals. However, one aspect that has been missing in all of these developments is the perspective of the developing countries of the world. While we know a great deal about managing human resources, it is primarily from the perspective of writers in the developed and Western countries. The perspective of managing human resources in the developing countries would not only be informative, but helpful in understanding human resource management policies and practices in the developed countries.

Pawan Budhwar and Yaw Debrah have given us this perspective with Human Resource Management in Developing Countries. These experts in developing countries have gathered together fifteen authors to describe human resource management in thirteen major developing countries of the world, accounting for almost one half of the world’s population! These authors, most of whom are indigenous to the countries they are analysing, provide a most insightful review of human resource management as practised in their country. In addition, because of their local knowledge, in combination with knowledge of human resource management in developed countries, they are able to offer a special and unique understanding of human resource management in their developing countries. Furthering the utility of this book is the use by the authors of a common model of human resource management that is offered by Budhwar and Debrah. Thus, each of these original chapters offers insights and understandings that are comparable across countries.

Without doubt the authors have achieved their main objectives of filling a much needed gap in our knowledge of human resource management and providing a book that can be used as a textbook in graduate and undergraduate courses. Indeed, this book should also prove useful to practitioners in multinational companies as well as those who want to prepare themselves and their organizations to work in new and developing countries. For all of us, this knowledge about human

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Human Resource Management in Developing Countries
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Figures ix
  • Tables xi
  • Foreword xv
  • Preface xvii
  • Acknowledgements xix
  • 1 - Introduction 1
  • References 12
  • Part I - Human Resource Management in Asia 17
  • 2 - Human Resource Management in the People’s Republic of China 19
  • 3 - Human Resource Management in South Korea 34
  • References 54
  • 4 - Human Resource Management in Taiwan 56
  • 5 - Human Resource Management in India 75
  • 6 - Human Resource Management in Nepal 91
  • 7 - Human Resource Management in Pakistan 102
  • 8 - Human Resource Management in Iran 121
  • References 133
  • 9 - Human Resource Management in Saudi Arabia 135
  • References 149
  • Part II - Human Resource Management in Africa 153
  • 10 - Human Resource Management in Algeria 155
  • References 172
  • 11 - Human Resource Management in Nigeria 174
  • References 188
  • 12 - Human Resource Management in Ghana 190
  • 13 - Human Resource Management in Kenya 209
  • 14 - Human Resource Management in South Africa 222
  • 15 - Conclusion 238
  • Subject Index 255
  • Name Index 259
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