Human Resource Management in Developing Countries

By Pawan S. Budhwar; Yaw A. Debrah | Go to book overview

5

Human resource management in India

Pawan S. Budhwar

Introduction

This introduction highlights three things: background information on India; recent developments in the Indian economy; and a review of Indian human resource management (HRM) literature. The latter part of the chapter presents results from a large-scale HRM survey. Finally, the main conclusions and future challenges facing Indian HR managers are highlighted.

India is a democratic republic, comprising twenty-five states and seven union territories. It borders Bangladesh, Bhutan and Burma in the east, China in the north and north-east, Pakistan in the west and north-west and Sri Lanka in the south. It occupies a strategic location in South Asia for international trade. With an area of 3.3 million square km, India is the second largest country in Asia and the seventh largest in the world. A former British colony, India has emerged as the largest democracy in the world since independence in 1947.

India is the birthplace of three of the world’s main religions: Hinduism (about 7000 years BC), Buddhism (487 BC) and Sikhism (1699 AD). Indian society comprises six main religious groups: Hindus (83.2 per cent), Muslims (11 per cent), Sikhs (2 per cent), Christians (2 per cent), Jains and Buddhists (less than 1 per cent). There are over three thousand castes.

India has 179 languages and 544 dialects. The Constitution recognises sixteen languages, Hindi and English being the two official languages. India has one of the largest English-speaking populations in the Asia-Pacific region. The literacy rate for those over 15 years of age is 51 per cent, but literacy is unevenly distributed (Budhwar, 2000a). These facts show the diverse nature of the Indian workforce.

Though rich in culture and natural resources, India currently faces a number of problems: political and religious instability; ever-increasing levels of population; unemployment and poverty; corruption in government offices; castism; a low per capita income; instability of output in agriculture and related sectors; slow privatisation of the bloated public sector; lack of adequate intellectual property protection; excessive bureaucracy; and an increasing gap between rich and poor. The level of corruption in politics is rapidly rising.

After independence, the government set up a ‘Planning Commission’ in 1950 to formulate national plans. Since then (till early 1990s) a ‘mixed economy’

-75-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Human Resource Management in Developing Countries
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Figures ix
  • Tables xi
  • Foreword xv
  • Preface xvii
  • Acknowledgements xix
  • 1 - Introduction 1
  • References 12
  • Part I - Human Resource Management in Asia 17
  • 2 - Human Resource Management in the People’s Republic of China 19
  • 3 - Human Resource Management in South Korea 34
  • References 54
  • 4 - Human Resource Management in Taiwan 56
  • 5 - Human Resource Management in India 75
  • 6 - Human Resource Management in Nepal 91
  • 7 - Human Resource Management in Pakistan 102
  • 8 - Human Resource Management in Iran 121
  • References 133
  • 9 - Human Resource Management in Saudi Arabia 135
  • References 149
  • Part II - Human Resource Management in Africa 153
  • 10 - Human Resource Management in Algeria 155
  • References 172
  • 11 - Human Resource Management in Nigeria 174
  • References 188
  • 12 - Human Resource Management in Ghana 190
  • 13 - Human Resource Management in Kenya 209
  • 14 - Human Resource Management in South Africa 222
  • 15 - Conclusion 238
  • Subject Index 255
  • Name Index 259
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 264

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.