Culture in Mind: Toward a Sociology of Culture and Cognition

By Karen A. Cerulo | Go to book overview

Acknowledgments

The papers that constitute this volume were originally presented at a conference entitled “Toward a Sociology of Culture and Cognition,” held at Rutgers University in November 1999. I am grateful not only to this volume’s contributors, but to all those who presented their work at that event. These participants are all significant to the establishment of a new and exciting intellectual agenda.

I take this opportunity to acknowledge gratefully the many sponsors that made this project possible: the American Sociological Association’s Funds for the Advancement of the Discipline, the Rutgers University Center for the Critical Analysis of Contemporary Culture, the Rutgers University Research Council, the Rutgers University Institute for Health, Health Care Policy, and Aging, and Rutgers University’s Vice President of academic affairs, Dean of Social Sciences, Graduate School, and Department of Sociology.

Special thanks go to my research assistant Ruth Simpson, who contributed significantly to the conference organization and provided insightful feedback on sections of this volume. Ruth also designed the wonderful Web site that accompanies both of these efforts. This collection also greatly benefited from Lyn Spillman’s careful and constructive review of the original proposal. I am grateful as well to Paul DiMaggio, Allan V. Horwitz, Magali Sarfatti Larson, Janet Ruane, Robert Wuthnow, and Eviatar Zerubavel for their intellectual and collegial support during various phases of this project. Finally, thanks go to my wonderful editor Ilene Kalish and the equally wonderful staff at Routledge (especially assistant editor Kimberly Guinta and production editors Tom Wang and Hope Breeman) for their help in bringing this project to fruition.

-ix-

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