Culture in Mind: Toward a Sociology of Culture and Cognition

By Karen A. Cerulo | Go to book overview

Contributors

David L. Altheide is Regents’ Professor and Interim Director in the School of Justice Studies at Arizona State University. His work has focused on the role of mass media and information technology for social control. Two recent theoretical and methodological statements on the relevance of the mass media for sociological analysis are An Ecology of Communication: Cultural Formats of Control (Aldine de Gruyter, 1995) and Qualitative Media Analysis (Sage, 1996). He is completing a book on the organization and social impact of news media emphasis on fear-as-entertainment.

Karen A. Cerulo is Associate Professor of Sociology at Rutgers University where she specializes in culture and cognition research. Her articles appear in a wide variety of journals and annuals. Her books include Identity Designs: The Sights and Sounds of a Nation—winner of the Culture Section’s “Best Book Award, 1996” (ASA Rose Book series, Rutgers University Press, 1995), Deciphering Violence: The Cognitive Order of Right and Wrong (Routledge, 1998), and Second Thoughts: Seeing Conventional Wisdom Through the Sociological Eye (with Janet Ruane, Pine Forge, Sage, 2000).

Paul DiMaggio is Professor of Sociology at Princeton University and Research Coordinator of Princeton’s Center for Arts and Cultural Policy Studies. He has written widely on topics in the sociology of culture, organization theory, and economic sociology and is editor of The 21st Century Firm: Changing Economic Organization in International Perspective (Princeton University Press, 2001). His current research focuses on cultural conflict in the contemporary United States and inequality in access to the new digital technologies.

Wendy Nelson Espeland is associate professor of sociology at Northwestern University. She is currently writing a book with Mitchell Stevens on commensuration. In 1998 she published The Struggle for Water: Politics, Rationality, and Identity (University of Chicago Press). Her research investigates how conceptions of what it means to be rational arise, and how these inform politics.

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