Children on the Streets of the Americas: Homelessness, Education, and Globalization in the United States, Brazil, and Cuba

By Roslyn Arlin Mickelson | Go to book overview

diametrically opposed to the culture of the school than those typical social class differences with which we are more familiar. Nonetheless, in equating homelessness with generic dependency and at-risk behavior, while maintaining adherence to an achievement ideology with its claims of inclusivity in the midst of exclusionary practice, schools express their own form of ideological dependency. This dependency is fostered by an unwillingness of a middle class to admit directly to the existence of class conflict and confront its own fears of facing potential homelessness. Given such a climate, the curricular and instructional activities that are utilized by caring and dedicated educators are even more remarkable, although it is difficult to conclude that they will ever become widespread. In acknowledging the presence of social pressures that limit the range of options available to those engaged in curricular and instructional practice, we are able to obtain a clearer perspective regarding the limitations and possibilities for curricular change and reform on a broader scale. If the treatment of homelessness is indicative, then those possibilities are indeed circumscribed.


REFERENCES

b

Blau, Joel. 1992. The Visible Poor: Homeless in the United States. New York: Oxford University Press.

Bourdieu, Pierre. 1977. Outline of a Theory of Practice. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Bourdieu, Pierre, and Jean-Claude Passeron. 1977. Reproduction in Education, Society and Culture. Beverly Hills, Calif.: Sage.


d

Douglas, Ann. 1992. Homeless Children and Their Families: A Resource Booklet for School Personnel. Malden, Mass.: Massachusetts Department of Education, Office for the Education of Homeless Children and Youth.


e

Enomoto, Ernestine K. 1994. “The Meaning of Truancy: Organizational Culture as Multicultures.” Urban Review 26: 187-207.


g

Gartner, Alan, and Dorothy Kerzner Lipsky. 1987. “Toward a Quality System for All Students.” Harvard Educational Review 57: 367-93.


h

Hargreaves, Andy. 1994. Changing Teachers, Changing Times. London: Cassell.

Heflin, L. Juane, and Kathryn Rudy. 1991. Homeless and in Need of Special Education: Exceptional Children at Risk. Reston, Va.: Council for Exceptional Children. (ERIC Document no. ED 339-167.)


j

Jessup, Bob. 1990. State Theory: Placing Capitalist States in Their Place. University Park: Pennsylvania State University.


n

Natriello, Gary, Edward L. McDill, and Aaron M. Pallas. 1990. Schooling Disadvantaged Children:Racing against Catastrophe. New York: Teachers College Press.

Nuñez, Ralph da Costa. 1994. “Access to Success: Meeting the Educational Needs of Homeless Children and Families.” Social Work in Education 16: 21-30.


o

Okey, Ted N., and Philip A. Cusick. 1995. “Dropping Out: Another Side of the Story.” EducationalAdministration Quarterly 31: 244-67.


p

Popkewitz, Thomas S. 1987. “The Formation of School Subjects and the Political Context of Schooling.” Pp. 1-24 in The Formation of the School Subjects, edited by Thomas S. Popkewitz. New York: Falmer Press.


q

Quint, Sharon. 1994. Schooling Homeless Children: A Working Model for America’s PublicSchools. New York: Teachers College Press.


u

U.S. Department of Education. 1992. Serving Homeless Children: The Responsibilities of Educators. Washington, D.C.: Author.


w

Weinreb, Linda, and Peter H. Rossi. 1995. “The American Homeless Family Shelter System.” SocialService Review 69: 86-101.


y

Yon, Maria G. 1995. “Educating Homeless Children in the United States.” Equity and Excellence inEducation 28: 58-62.

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