Teaching as a Professional Discipline

By Geoffrey Squires | Go to book overview

Chapter 4

Analysing the Class
The Micro Model, as its name suggests, deals with what goes on minute by minute and even second by second in the classroom, workshop, laboratory or wherever else teaching is taking place. It offers a way of analysing these events and interactions in terms of what the teacher is doing (functions), what affects what he or she is doing (variables) and how he or she does it (procedures). While the list of variables is similar though not quite the same as in the Macro Model—referring to the why, what, who and where of teaching—the function headings are quite different, and the third dimension (procedures) relates to the familiar methods that classroom teaching involves, rather than the tasks and stages of putting on a course that were dealt with in the last chapter. The Model is set out in Fig. 4.1, and as with the previous model, a glossary is provided to help indicate the meanings of the headings, although these can only really be fleshed out in the text of this chapter, and readers might want to add some alternatives of their own. As before, I shall take each dimension in turn, explaining the headings and the reasons for using them, and then show how the three can be related to form an integrated, multi-dimensional view of teaching. Since the general arguments for this kind of model have already been rehearsed, they will not be repeated here. The underlying logic is the same and would be the same if, for example, one developed a generic educational management model that subsumed the macro, course model. The management of education—involving another professional discipline—also has its functions, variables and procedures. The basic approach can thus be applied to the various levels of educational activity, and the Micro Model should be seen as ‘nesting’ within the Macro Model.
MICRO MODEL: GLOSSARY
Micro Functions
MOTIVATE: stimulate, interest, arouse, energize
AUDIT: diagnose, identify prior or baseline knowledge and expectations
ORIENTATE: establish direction, purpose, objectives, agenda
INPUT: impart, inform, transmit
EXPLAIN: clarify, amplify, interpret, relate
EXPLORE: enquire, discover, debate
REFLECT: encourage meta-cognition, meta-affect, meta-learning
TASK: drill, rehearse, exercise, practise, activate

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Teaching as a Professional Discipline
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • List of Figures and Tables vi
  • Preface vii
  • Chapter 1 - The Paradigm Problem 1
  • Chapter 2 - The Nature of Professional Disciplines 23
  • Chapter 3 - Analysing the Course 37
  • Chapter 4 - Analysing the Class 75
  • Chapter 5 - Theory, Expertise and Practice 109
  • Chapter 6 - Research, Training and Evaluation 133
  • References 143
  • Index 157
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