International Trade: New Patterns of Trade, Production & Investment

By Nigel Grimwade | Go to book overview

shown a marked reluctance to expose their domestic service sectors to the full blast of foreign competition. This is perhaps not surprising given the political sensitivity of the sectors in question. Liberalisation is further complicated by the fact that barriers to trade in services invariably take a different form to trade in goods. Mostly, they result from different regulatory practices in different countries. Liberalisation, therefore, necessitates each country making specific commitments to alter some national laws. The consequences of any such commitments are often difficult to measure, so that countries can never be sure that the concessions that they make are matched by equivalent benefits as a result of similar commitments by other trading partners. Trade in services will remain a major item on the agenda of multilateral trade negotiations in the next century. Pressures will increase from the western industrialised countries for faster progress. To the extent that these negotiations are successful, trade in services can be expected to become more important as a component of world trade in the future.


Notes for Further Reading

Few conventional textbooks on Trade include a separate chapter on Service Trade, as this is assumed to be governed by the same principles as trade in goods. However, one exception to this is:

Greenaway D. and Winters A., Surveys in International Trade (Oxford: Basil Blackwell, 1994).

which contains an excellent chapter (Chapter 10) by A. Sapir and C. Winters on service trade. Another useful reference is:

Porter M. The Competitive Advantage of Nations (London: Macmillan, 1990).

This also contains an excellent chapter on the internationalisation of service activity with some useful case studies.

On the liberalisation of trade in services, the following are essential reading:

Nicolaides P. Liberalising Services Trade, Chatham House Papers, (London: RIIA/Routledge, 1989).

although the book pre-dates the signing of the GATS Agreement. An additional source is:

Trebilock M.T. and Howse R., The Regulation of International Trade, 2nd edn. (London and New York: Routledge, 1995).

which has excellent chapters on trade in services and TRIPs.

A more recent source on trade liberalisation dealing exclusively with financial services is:

Key S.J., Financial Services in the Uruguay Round and the WTO, Occasional Paper 54 (Washington DC: Group of Thirty).

For statistical information on trade in services, see the WTO’s Annual Report.

For information on the service sector in the U.K. economy, the reader should consult:

Julius DeA. and Butler J., Inflation and Growth in a Service Economy (Bank of England Quarterly Bulletin, November, 1998).

-389-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
International Trade: New Patterns of Trade, Production & Investment
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 424

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.