Growing Up and Growing Old in Ancient Rome: A Life Course Approach

By Mary Harlow; Ray Laurence | Go to book overview

7

KINSHIP EXTENSION AND AGE MIXING THROUGH MARRIAGE

In ancient Rome, there was an expectation that its citizens (male and female) would marry and have children throughout their adult lives. It could be described as a duty associated with citizenship, in order that the state maintained a body of citizens that ultimately it could have called upon for its survival. On the other hand, parents and grandparents expected their successors to marry to establish the succession and survival of the family name in the future. More immediately, marriage could be seen as a process by which a family could extend its kin network to include others and to make connections that secured the support of persons beyond their immediate or existing network of relatives (Corbier 1991:136). In the past the nature of these connections has often been viewed as a determining factor in the politics of the late Republic. However, this is not our concern here; what we wish to show is the potential of marriage as a process of kin extension and that the nature of kin extension varied according to the age of the bride and bridegroom at marriage. Our methodology for approaching this problem is to base our research primarily on the demographic life tables produced by Richard Saller (1994, see Appendix) and to combine these theoretical possibilities with a number of examples drawn from ancient sources. The latter, it has to be stated, are far from representative of all marriages. In particular, Pompey’s many marriages reported by Plutarch (Life of Pompey) are emblematic exempla for a second century AD audience, looking back to the disasters of the first century BC. Other examples that we utilise are necessarily drawn from the letters of Cicero. There is an inevitable reliance on these two sources of information in the discussion of marriage at Rome. This can be seen clearly from Susan Treggiari’s index of principal texts cited for her study of Roman Marriage (1991a:547-8). After the legal sources, Cicero is the main author cited and discussed. Other studies of marriage follow this pattern, particularly in the discussion of kin extension—a social phenomenon not covered by Roman law, in that they necessarily rely on certain key examples from the Roman republic based on information from Cicero and Plutarch (e.g. Bradley 1991:156-76). In short, our knowledge of Roman marriage as a social phenomenon is limited once we step beyond the legal framework. We recognise that our source 92

-92-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Growing Up and Growing Old in Ancient Rome: A Life Course Approach
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • List of Illustrations vi
  • Preface vii
  • 1 - Introduction 1
  • 2 - The Location of the Life Course 20
  • 3 - The Beginning of Life 34
  • 4 - Transition to Adulthood 1 54
  • 5 - Transition to Adulthood 2 65
  • 6 - The Place of Marriage in the Life Course 79
  • 7 - Kinship Extension and Age Mixing Through Marriage 92
  • 8 - Age and Politics 104
  • 9 - Getting Old 117
  • 10 - Death and Memory 132
  • 11 - Age and Ageing in the Roman Empire and Beyond 144
  • Appendix 151
  • Bibliography 165
  • Index 175
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 184

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.