Understanding Terrorism in America: From the Klan to Al Qaeda

By Christopher Hewitt | Go to book overview

Appendix

Data sources and coding procedures

The data set is based on several kinds of published sources. Initially, I used general chronologies starting with Trick (1976) for the 1965-76 period, those in the Annual of Power and Conflict (1976-81), and the FBI’s annual reports, which begin in 1980. 1 In addition, useful sources on particular ideological waves of terrorism include the following.

For Klan terrorism, the House Committee on Un-American Activities report, The Present Day Ku Klux Klan Movement (1967), Bullard (1989, 1998), Newton and Newton (1991), and Nelson (1993). The most comprehensive chronology of leftist and black violence covering the 1965-70 period is in Scanlans (1971). Sources for particular groups include Heath (1976), Epstein (1971), and Pearson (1994) on the Black Panthers, Howard (1979) on the Zebra killings, Castellucci (1986) on the M19CO group, and McLellan (1977) on the Symbionese Liberation Army. For Puerto Rican terrorism, Sater (1981) provides a good chronology, and Fernandez (1987, 1994) covers the activities of the Macheteros. There are two chronologies of Jewish violence and terrorism, Sater (1996) and Russ (1981), as well as a good study of the Jewish Defense League by Friedman (1990). Statistics on Cuban terrorism are given in Herman (1980), Garcia (1996), and Uriarte-Gaston (1984). Anti-abortion violence is documented in detail by the National Abortion Federation. The violent activities of the New Right are closely monitored by watchdog groups, the most important of which are the SPLC and the ADL. Their reports are the main source of information on racist and antisemitic violence. See, for example, Ku Klux Klan: A history of racism and violence by the SPLC, and Shaved for Battle: Skinheads target America’s youth, and Hate Groups in America by the ADL. Additional sources include Melnichak (1991), Flynn et al. (1989), Hamm (1993), and Coates (1987).

The Reader’s Guide to Periodicals, Keesing’s, Facts on File, and the New York Times index were searched for any reported incidents of

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Understanding Terrorism in America: From the Klan to Al Qaeda
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Tables viii
  • Illustrations x
  • Series Editors’ Preface xi
  • Preface xvi
  • 1 - The Latest Atrocity 1
  • 2 - Before September 11 12
  • 3 - The Political Context of American Terrorism 23
  • Notes 51
  • 4 - The Organizational Dynamics of Terrorism 53
  • 5 - The Terrorists 69
  • 6 - Dealing with Terrorists 82
  • 7 - Impacts and Consequences 106
  • 8 - The Future of American Terrorism 119
  • Appendix 134
  • Bibliography 138
  • Index 149
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