Enter the Body: Women and Representation on Shakespeare's Stage

By Carol Chillington Rutter | Go to book overview

PLATES
1 ‘Cordelia! stay a little.’ Paul Scofield and Diana Rigg in Peter Brook’s 1962 staged King Lear. 20
2 ‘Look there, look there!’ Robert Stephens and Abigail McKern in Adrian Noble’s 1993 King Lear. 21
3 ‘What is’t thou say’st?’ John Wood, Alex Kingston and David Troughton in Nick Hytner’s 1990 King Lear. 24
4 Ophelia rises from the grave. Jean Simmons and Terence Morgan in Olivier’s 1948 Hamlet. 43
5 Dead Ophelia. Helena Bonham-Carter in Zeffirelli’s 1990 Hamlet. 45
6 ‘Hold off the earth awhile.’ Laertes with Ophelia in the grave. Kate Winslet and Michael Maloney in Kenneth Branagh’s 1996 Hamlet. 50
7 Ophelia’s Gothic funeral in Kenneth Branagh’s 1996 Hamlet. 51
8 Cleopatra receives Caesar’s messenger. Peggy Ashcroft and her court in Glen Byam Shaw’s 1953 Antony and Cleopatra. 58
9 ‘Times, O times!’ Cleopatra and her court. Janet Suzman in Trevor Nunn’s 1972 Antony and Cleopatra. 59
10 ‘We are for the dark.’ Cleopatra and her girls. Clare Higgins, Claire Benedict, Susie Lee Hayward in John Caird’s 1992 Antony and Cleopatra. 60
11 Cleopatra observed by Iras—‘the black body behind’. Helen Mirren and Josette Simon in Adrian Noble’s 1982 Antony and Cleopatra. 63
12 ‘I am the African Queen!’ Whoopi Goldberg as Queen Elizabeth, 1999 Oscar Awards, Los Angeles. Judi Dench as Queen Elizabeth in John Madden’s 1998 Shakespeare in Love. 102

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