Classic Country: Legends of Country Music

By Charles K. Wolfe | Go to book overview

Brown’s Ferry Four

The line between classic country and classic gospel sometimes gets pretty fuzzy—witness the work of the Bailes Brothers, the Chuck Wagon Gang, James and Martha Carson, the Oak Ridge Boys, Jimmie Davis, and others. Until recently, many country listeners’ polls routinely selected as their “favorite gospel group” an act led by Grandpa Jones and called The Hee Haw Gospel Quartet. Though that venerable show has drifted into a state of permanent rerun, the quartet still remains a popular feature: four men and one guitar doing the classic gospel songs of Albert Brumley, Thomas Dorsay, Vep Ellis, and others. But what many younger fans may not recognize is that this quartet is itself a continuation of an earlier quartet, one that in the 1940s made country music history and set the style for a whole generation of groups to follow: the Brown’s Ferry Four.

The original Brown’s Ferry Four was formed during the turbulent days of World War II, and existed in various forms until the mid-1950s. It is best known for the forty-five songs it recorded for the King record label out of Cincinnati—songs that became best sellers, records that were played to death by radio stations and even worn out in jukeboxes. This original quartet was composed of four men who went on to become country music legends: Grandpa Jones, Merle Travis, and Alton and Rabon Delmore, who had pioneered close-harmony duet singing on the Grand Ole Opry in the 1930s. Later on, the quartet included, at various times, other greats like Red Foley, Clyde Moody, Zeke Turner, Red Turner (no relation), and Louis Innis. It was the work of these men that forged the Brown’s Ferry Four sound—and defined what many fans think of when they hear the term “country gospel.”

The story of the group starts in June 1943, when Grandpa, Merle, and the Delmores all found themselves working at station WLW in Cincinnati. The war was well under way, and young men were being

-103-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Classic Country: Legends of Country Music
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 334

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.