Classic Country: Legends of Country Music

By Charles K. Wolfe | Go to book overview

Jimmie Riddle

People who have enough patience to dig beneath the hype and glitter of modern Nashville will discover that the city is an incredible nest for all manner of veteran musicians and older musical traditions. A case in point is the late Jimmie Riddle, who died on December 10, 1982. Jimmie spent most of his musical career in Nashville, was heard by thousands as a longtime member of Roy Acuff’s Smoky Mountain Boys, and was seen by millions doing his hambone routines with Jackie Phelps on Hee Haw. Yet few realized how rare and unique a performer Riddle was; by nature, he was a retiring, easygoing man who was more content to break up his friends at a local tavern doing his great mouth music renditions of “Stars and Stripes Forever” than pursue hit records. Jimmie, indeed, made only a handful of solo records, including one incredible LP, and most fans still remember him as a piano player and harmonica player with Acuff. Not many know about his rare ability to do the odd, hiccupping rhythm singing he calls “eephing” or “hoodlin’” and few know about his imitations, comic singing, mugging, and “hand squeaking.”

In November 1979 I interviewed Jimmie for the PBS series Southbound and he told me something about his career and his rare ability to make sounds with his hands and mouth. At the time, we made tentative plans for a second, more leisurely interview, and even talked about a new album. Unfortunately, neither of these projects ever came about, but in going over the tapes from November, I found that Jimmie had expressed himself very well, and that his own account of his career was about as succinct and impressive as anyone could ask for.

“I was born in Dyersburg [Tennessee], on September 3, quite a few years ago,” he began. “My parents left Dyersburg when I was just a month old, and moved to Memphis. Old Bluff City. Shelby County. That’s where I was raised, until I left and went to Texas. Memphis was a real city when I was growing up there. I used to go down and play in the

-188-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Classic Country: Legends of Country Music
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 334

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.