Classic Country: Legends of Country Music

By Charles K. Wolfe | Go to book overview

The Statler Brothers

One summer day shortly after the Civil War ended, two young men made their way up a dusty road toward a village called Singer’s Glen in the Shenandoah Valley of Virginia. Their names were Aldine Kieffer and Ephriam Ruebush, and they had met in a Union prisoner-of-war camp; both were lovers of music, and Kieffer’s grandfather had operated a songbook-printing company before the war. Now the two friends had in mind resurrecting the company, but as they got into the town and looked over the scene, they found the printing presses broken up, overgrown with weeds, the type jumbled and spilled. Determined, though, they set to work, cleaned up the print shop, picked up the spilled type, and were soon publishing new books of gospel songs.

These books used a system of shaped notes rather than the round ones generally used by northern and European publishers, and it quickly spread throughout the South. To help encourage it, the two friends decided to organize the Virginia Normal School, which began to dispatch singing teachers throughout the South. One of the pupils was a Tennessean named James D. Vaughan, who eventually started his own publishing company, and hit upon the idea of promoting his new songs by sending quartets of well-trained singers on the road to give free concerts in local churches. Within a generation, these male quartets were becoming more popular than the songs they were singing, and by the 1920s they had become synonymous with gospel singing itself.

In the early days of country music, many of the ideas of what consitituted good singing came from this gospel tradition. A lot of early singers got their training in harmony, meter, and tone from the old-time “singing schools” and early quartets. Opry pioneer Kirk McGee attended them as a child, as did the Delmore Brothers, Bill and Charlie Monroe, A.P. Carter, and others. Members of the old colorful string bands like the Red Fox Chasers, the Georgia Yellow Hammers, and Dr.

-221-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Classic Country: Legends of Country Music
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 334

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.