Higher Education through Open and Distance Learning

By Keith Harry | Go to book overview

programmes of DTIs have eventually been equipped with skills that have high significance in their own teaching and research activities. While educational technology and distance education are converging, this has inevitably contributed to improvement in the practices of higher education in general and open distance education in particular, with distance education (enriched through staff development and other innovations) playing the lead role. In the whole process, however, the issue to be addressed and worked out by both the players is how to ensure interactivity in learning, active learning, and learning effectiveness. Finally, the debate on parity of esteem notwithstanding (which is gradually receding), within the framework of open learning, it is worth noting Smith (1987:34): ‘As distance education becomes more open, opportunities for the application of distance education methods in campus-based education will increase’. The convergence that is emerging in India would inevitably embrace the above and vice versa.


References
Gandhe, S.K. (1998) ‘Access and equity: need of the disadvantaged’, paper submitted to Asian Association of Open Universities 12th Annual Conference, Hong Kong.
GOI (1962) Report of Expert Committee on Correspondence Courses, New Delhi: Ministry of Education.
GOI (1994) Open Schooling in India: Situational Analysis, Need Assessment, Strategy Identification, New Delhi: Ministry of Human Resource Development.
GOI (1997) Government Subsidies in India: Discussion Paper, New Delhi: Department of Economic Affairs, Ministry of Finance.
IGNOU (1998) Vice-Chancellor’s Report (Ninth Convocation), New Delhi: Indira Gandhi National Open University.
Mukherjee, N. (1997) ‘Loka Siksha Sambad’ (Council for People’s Education), Open Praxis, 2, 13 and 21.
Mukhopadhyay, M. (1994) ‘The unfolding of an open learning institution: the National Open School of India’, in M. Mukhopadhyay and S. Phillips (eds), Open Schooling: Selected Experience, Vancouver: Commonwealth of Learning.
Naidu, C.G. (1993) ‘Some economic aspects of conventional and distance education system in India’, paper presented to Asian Association of Open Universities conference, Hong Kong.
Panda, S. (1996) ‘Translating open university policies into practice in India’, in T. Evans and D. Nation (eds), Opening Education: Policies and Practices from Open and Distance Education, London: Routledge.
Panda, S., Garg, S. and Khan, A.R. (1998) ‘Growth and development of the national open university’, in S. Panda (ed.), Open and Distance Education: Policies, Practices and Quality Concerns, New Delhi: Aravali Books International.
Pillai, C.R. and Naidu, C.G. (1998) ‘Cost-effectiveness of distance higher education’, in S. Panda (ed.), Open and Distance Education: Policies, Practices and Quality Concerns, New Delhi: Aravali Books International.
Powar, K.B. (1997) Higher Education in India since Independence: Retrospect and Future Options, New Delhi: Association of Indian Universities.

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