Affirmative Action and Black Entrepreneurship

By Thomas D. Boston | Go to book overview

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

Beverly Goldberg of The Century Foundation encouraged me to undertake this research. I am deeply indebted to her and to the Foundation for generous support and enduring patience. I also thank Dave Smith and Kathleen Quinn of the Foundation for helping me focus the arguments of the book.

Tim Bates provided a great deal of encouragement and many insightful comments on this book. But, more importantly, he planted the seeds of so many ideas that are explored in detail here. Thanks Tim and thanks also to Andrew F. Brimmer and Margaret C. Simms for helpful comments on chapters of the book that were presented at professional meetings. Without the cooperation and assistance of Sue Ross and Michael Sullivan, former Directors of the Office of Contract Compliance at the City of Atlanta, and Michael Cooper, Director of the Office of Contract Compliance at Fulton County, Georgia, this research would not have been possible. I also thank former Mayors Maynard Jackson and Andrew Young, and current Mayor Bill Campbell for letting me assist in the planning, development and implementation of Atlanta’s Equal Business Opportunity Program. I thank the directors of the following organizations for endorsing this research and cooperating with me in its conduct: the Atlanta Business League, Georgia Minority Supplier Development Council, Office of Contract Compliance at the Atlanta Public School System, Office of Contract Compliance of the Metropolitan Atlanta Rapid Transit System, Office of Contract Compliance of Dekalb County, and Grady Health Systems Office of Disadvantaged Business Enterprises. Finally, I thank Wanda Gail Greene, Krista Tillery and Tarek Saoud for their research assistance.

-xiv-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Affirmative Action and Black Entrepreneurship
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Tables ix
  • Foreword xi
  • Acknowledgments xiv
  • Introduction 1
  • 1 - Opportunity Matters 10
  • 2 - Strict Scrutiny is “strict in Theory and Fatal in Fact” 33
  • 3 - Recent Trends Among Black-Owned Businesses in Atlanta 49
  • 4 - A Snapshot of the Past When Equal Business Opportunity Did Not Exist 63
  • 5 - What Causes the Lag in Black Entrepreneurship? 73
  • 6 - A Judicial Commission on Strict Scrutiny is Needed 83
  • 7 - Twenty by Ten 89
  • Appendix 101
  • Notes 102
  • Bibliography 108
  • Index 112
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 114

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.