Affirmative Action and Black Entrepreneurship

By Thomas D. Boston | Go to book overview

4

A SNAPSHOT OF THE PAST WHEN EQUAL BUSINESS OPPORTUNITY DID NOT EXIST

The historical record

The City of Atlanta was chartered in 1847 and the presence of successful black-owned businesses can be traced to the turn of the twentieth century. By 1890, the 28,098 blacks residing in the city constituted 43 percent of its population, but a rapid in-migration of whites occurred at the turn of the century. This caused the black population to decrease to 39 percent by 1900, 34 percent by 1910 and 31 percent by 1920. In 1930, the black population increased to 33 percent and remained at that level until I960 when blacks constituted 38 percent of Atlanta s population. During the 1960s, whites moved to the suburbs in such great numbers that by 1970 the city’s population of 495,000 residents was 51 percent black. Suburban movement of whites continued between 1980 and 1990, causing Atlanta’s population to decrease to 394,000 while the metropolitan area gained 725,000 residents during the decade. The loss of white residents to the suburbs boosted the city’s black presence to 67.1 percent of the total population. 1

Even though blacks represented a large percentage of Atlanta’s population and they had operated prosperous business ventures since the beginning of the twentieth century, 126 years passed before the city awarded a procurement contract to a black-owned firm. The award was for $13,000 in 1973.

It is virtually impossible to rationalize this racial exclusion. Not only were there qualified black entrepreneurs in Atlanta, but the historical record indicates that, prior to the passage of laws aimed at driving black contractors out of the local marketplace, blacks were as competitive in some areas as their white counterparts.

-63-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Affirmative Action and Black Entrepreneurship
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Tables ix
  • Foreword xi
  • Acknowledgments xiv
  • Introduction 1
  • 1 - Opportunity Matters 10
  • 2 - Strict Scrutiny is “strict in Theory and Fatal in Fact” 33
  • 3 - Recent Trends Among Black-Owned Businesses in Atlanta 49
  • 4 - A Snapshot of the Past When Equal Business Opportunity Did Not Exist 63
  • 5 - What Causes the Lag in Black Entrepreneurship? 73
  • 6 - A Judicial Commission on Strict Scrutiny is Needed 83
  • 7 - Twenty by Ten 89
  • Appendix 101
  • Notes 102
  • Bibliography 108
  • Index 112
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 114

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.