Personality at Work: The Role of Individual Differences in the Workplace

By Adrian Furnham | Go to book overview

Chapter 9

Personality, leisure, sport, unemployment and retirement

There can be no high civilization where there is not ample leisure.

H.W. Beedner

I must confess that I am interested in leisure in the same way that a poor man is interested in money.

Prince Philip

Serious sport has nothing to do with fair play…it is war minus the shooting.

George Orwell

It is a general truth that those persons who are good at games are good at nothing else. Generally speaking, good players are but miserable and useless persons.

Thomas Tegg

It is almost impossible to remember how tragic a place the world is when one is playing golf.

Robert Lynd

It seems to me that the main contact the bulk of English have with sport consists in looking on, and betting.

G. Renier

Retirement means twice as much husband on half as much money.

Anon

One of the many pleasures of old age is giving things up.

Malcolm Muggeridge

It’s a recession when your neighbour loses his job; it’s a depression when you lose your own.

H. Truman

A man willing to work, and unable to find work, is perhaps the saddest sight that fortune’s inequality exhibits under the sun.

Thomas Carlyle

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