Personality at Work: The Role of Individual Differences in the Workplace

By Adrian Furnham | Go to book overview

Chapter 11

Conclusion

Today’s businessman must have the genius of Einstein, the memory of an elephant and the education of a lawyer, scientist, and educator all wrapped in one.

R. Long

One man, no matter how brilliant, can’t be a successful corporation. A successful corporation is a group effort. The man at the top can help shape and define the company’s goals; he can create an environment that gets people working together creatively; and he can act as umpire. He might know it all, but can’t run it all alone.

H. Gleason

Businesses aren’t run by geniuses. It is a matter of putting one foot after another in a logical fashion. The trick is in knowing in what direction you want to go.

J. Barker


11.1 INTRODUCTION

It seems completely self-evident to the layperson that people have ‘stable’ personalities and that personality variables correlate with, and hence predict, occupational behaviour. This book has attempted to review systematically the literature on personality correlates of such things as vocational preference, work motivation, productivity, satisfaction, absenteeism and accidents. The research in this whole area is highly patchy: some topics have been relatively ignored, others thoroughly investigated; some topics and areas are highly dominated by particular theoretical or methodological approaches; some research is of a highly scientific standard, other studies are poorly executed for a number of reasons. The first chapter discussed the reasons for the lack of rapprochement between personality and occupational psychology.

The balkanization of the discipline of psychology has meant that various branches have had progressively less and less contact with one another. Personality psychology and organizational behaviour are good examples.

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