Cyberpower: The Culture and Politics of Cyberspace and the Internet

By Tim Jordan | Go to book overview

Acknowledgements

Sincere and very grateful non-cyberspatial thanks to all the following.

Four generations of students in my third year unit ‘Cyberpunks’ helped form these ideas. Interviews with Mike Godwin, John Gilmore, Stanton McCandlish, John Perry Barlow, Lori Fena and Jonah Seiger provided a rapid education. Siraj Izhar and the Stalk provided helpful comments, as did Jordan Crandall and Eyebeam’s online discussion ‘Artistic Practice in the Network’. Paul Taylor taught me about hackers. Anonymous referees provided useful comments. Tony Higgins provided talk about all things computer and Alan Gavin about all other things. Stepping Stones provided a real-world counterpoint as this was written. Colleagues at UeL offered an always-exciting intellectual context. Funding from the Sociology Department at the University of East London meant teaching never overwhelmed research and allowed a sabbatical in which this book was completed. Barbara Harrison solved a sudden bout of technological determinism when, right at the end, all my computer resources failed. Rod Home and the Ashworth Centre for Social Theory provided an institutional home for six months at the University of Melbourne. Geraldine Williams and Joanne Mattingly at Routledge were always extremely helpful. Most of all, the Reds won again. And, of course, thanks to those I’ve forgotten.

Thanks to Mari Shullaw at Routledge who took a chance with these ideas, shepherded a decent book proposal and provided excellent comments and support.

Thanks to Mum, Jason, Gayle, Emerald, Denis, Mandy, Stewart, Georgy, Mark, Kim, Olivia and Mary for houses and fun in Melbourne. Thanks to Mum for all her support.

But most of all, thanks to Kate and Matilda, especially for starting a second great adventure.

May 1998

-ix-

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Cyberpower: The Culture and Politics of Cyberspace and the Internet
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Illustrations viii
  • Acknowledgements ix
  • Chapter 1 - Power and Cyberspace 1
  • Chapter 2 - Cyberspace and the Matrix 20
  • Chapter 3 - The Virtual Individual 59
  • Chapter 5 - The Virtual Social II 142
  • Chapter 6 - The Virtual Imaginary 179
  • Chapter 7 - Cyberpower 208
  • Notes 219
  • Glossary 229
  • Bibliography 233
  • Index 248
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