Freedom and the Court: Civil Rights and Liberties in the United States

By Henry J. Abraham | Go to book overview

VII
Race: The American Dilemma

IN THEORY the subject of this last chapter in our study should not present the sort of difficult line-drawing that has pervaded considerations of the topics already discussed. Surely, in the third quarter of the twentieth centuryrace could hardly, in enlightened democratic society, determine the outcome of an individual's quest for equality before the law and equality of opportunity. Yet theory does not necessarily govern practice, and although we have seen long strides taken toward the egalitarian goals of Negroes, both under law and in the mores of society, racial discrimination is still America's Achilles heel. Great progress has accompanied the decades following World War II, especially since the late 1950's, both in the extra-legal, private sector of our life, and in the legal sector. The sentiments and prejudices of large sections of the people in the North as well as in the South, die hard -- if indeed they die at all. And government, under the Constitution the great line-drawer in the absence of voluntary action, must always be cautious lest it move too far in advance of those sentiments and prejudices. For full enforcement of the civil rights of all, there must be mutual trust and respect -- and although government can accomplish much to promote trust and respect, it cannot ultimately be a substitute for the slow, hard process of education. Still, as the race problem has shown so well, leadership by responsible public officials is not only desirable but crucial at all stages. When the race controversy reached its zenith in the mid-1950's, it was once again the judicial branch of the government, with the Supreme Court at its apex, which led. While it did not lead eargerly or joyously, a people's rightful claims could no longer be ignored merely because the political, in particular the legislative, branches refused to become

-242-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Freedom and the Court: Civil Rights and Liberties in the United States
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Preface vii
  • Contents ix
  • I - Introduction 3
  • II - The "Double Standard" 7
  • III - The Bill of Rights and Its Applicability to the States 26
  • IV - The Fascinating World of "Due Process of Law" 79
  • V - The Precious Freedom of Expression 124
  • VI - Religion 172
  • VII - Race: the American Dilemma 242
  • Appendix 313
  • Bibliographical Note 317
  • General Index 323
  • Index to Court Cases 331
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 344

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.