The Catholic Reformation

By Michael A. Mullett | Go to book overview

6

The Catholic Reformation and the people

Whereas the public establishment of the Catholic faith in the Spanish Netherlands allowed for magnificence in the celebration of its rites and the importation of baroque religious art and architecture, in England, as in the Dutch Republic, persecution severely restricted opportunities for Catholic liturgical or artistic splendour. In England and Wales, Catholicism under Elizabeth (1558-1603) was equated with treason and associated with attempts, through alliance with Spain, to reverse the nation’s Protestant Reformation, fashioned in 1559. The Catholic clerical spokesmen Cardinal William Allen and the Jesuit Robert Persons (or Parsons, 1546-1610) confirmed government suspicions of Catholic loyalty with their advocacy of subversion and Spanish assistance, so as to restore Catholicism. A Catholic-inspired rebellion, the 1569 Revolt of the Northern Earls, directed at replacing Elizabeth with her Catholic cousin Mary Queen of Scots (1542-87), was supported by Pius V’s bull of excommunication and dethronement of Elizabeth, Regnans in Excelsis (1570). The menacing political implications of a Catholic religious mission to Protestant England became apparent from the 1570s with the arrival in the country of highly motivated Jesuit and seminary-trained priests from the Continent, and Elizabeth’s government and parliament responded with such measures as the Act of Persuasions of 1581, making it high treason, punishable by hanging, drawing and quartering, to convert English people to Catholicism or to be so converted. Obdurate lay Catholics (known legally as ‘recusants’) faced fines of an astronomical £20 per month for absence from Church of England worship, an attempted legislative deterrence of the significant gentry and aristocratic support that accrued to the Catholic cause. A century or so of the most intense penal period can be dated from about 1580, decades in which political crises such as the Spanish Armada of 1588, the 1605 Gunpowder Conspiracy against James I (1567-1625) and the Civil War which broke out in 1642, spasmodically accelerated the rates of persecution, especially of priests, 133 of whom were executed under Elizabeth alone. 1

Under persecution the English Catholic community reached a demographic platform of about 60,000 in 1680, at around the close of the most bitter period of persecution. The Catholic element very gradually tended to withdraw from political activism and, often led by lay women, cultivated on the whole a quiet,

-175-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Catholic Reformation
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Preface ix
  • 1 - ‘reform in Head and Members’ 1
  • 2 - The Council of Trent and the Catholic Reformation 29
  • 3 - New Religious Orders 69
  • 4 - The Papacy and the Episcopate of the Catholic Reformation 111
  • 5 - The Impact of the Catholic Reformation 142
  • 6 - The Catholic Reformation and the People 175
  • 7 - The Catholic Reformation and the Arts 196
  • Notes 215
  • Index 247
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 258

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.