Geoffrey Chaucer, the Critical Heritage

By Derek Brewer | Go to book overview

Contents
INTRODUCTION 1
BIBLIOGRAPHICAL NOTE 24
THE PRINCIPAL EDITIONS OF CHAUCER’S ‘WORKS’ UP TO 1933 27
Comments
1 RALPH WALDO EMERSON, The identity of all minds, 1837, 1849 (1850), 1856 33
2 RICHARD HENGIST HORNE, Translations, 1841 36
3 HENRY DAVID THOREAU, Homely, innocent, childish Chaucer, 1843 (1849) 50
4 ‘CHRISTOPHER NORTH’ (John Wilson), The allegory of love, 1845 58
5 SIR NICHOLAS HARRIS NICOLAS, A Life founded on documentary evidence, 1845 66
6 JOHN HENRY LEIGH HUNT, Geniality, singing, 1846, 1855 70
7 JAMES LORIMER, Chaucer is our Goethe, 1849 88
8 WILLIAM WATKISS LLOYD, Chaucer’s irony, 1856 99
9 JOHN RUSKIN, Fimesis and other matters, 1856, 1865, 1870, 1873, 1876 102
10 WALTER BAGEHOT, A healthy sagacious man of the world with a symmetrical mind, 1858 108
11 UNKNOWN, Story, situation and beauty, 1859 110
12 FRANCIS JAMES CHILD, Final -e, 1863 (1869) 122
13 WALTER SAVAGE LANDOR, Creatures like ourselves, 1863 123
14 ALEXANDER SMITH, Chaucer the English Conservative, 1863 125
15 FREDERICK DENISON MAURICE, Cordial affection for men and for nature, 1865 126
16 ‘MATTHEW BROWNE’ (William Brightly Rands), Chaucer the Laodicean, 1869 128
17 JAMES RUSSELL LOWELL, Sincere, tender, humane, 1870 (1871) 131
18 STOPFORD A.BROOKE, Natural beauty, 1871 149
19 FREDERICK JAMES FURNIVALL, Work at Chaucer, 1873 167
20 JOHN WESLEY HALES, Pity and irony, 1873 178
21 WILLIAM MINTO, The spirit of chivalry, 1876 180
22 WILLIAM CYPLES, Incredible sentimentality, and the old wonder of sex, 1877 188

-vii-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Geoffrey Chaucer, the Critical Heritage
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 512

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.