Teacher-led School Improvement

By David Frost; Judy Durrant et al. | Go to book overview

7

The Teacher as Change Agent

Andrew’s Story

This book is about teachers as agents of change and this chapter aims to explore teachers’ capacity to exercise leadership amd to initiate and manage school improvement work, through an illustrative case study. It is essentially a story about one teacher’s apprenticeship as a change agent. Andrew’s story was told in his own critical narrative account; it was then explored and developed in tape recorded critical conversations with his tutor and in research interviews with his senior managers.

Andrew entered the profession in 1992, a science teacher bringing with him the highest of recommendations from his PGCE course. In his second year of teaching he joined the school’s Reflective Action Planning group, which supported him through his first experiences of initiating and managing development work.


A Focus for Development

At the beginning of his second year with the programme, Andrew experienced some difficulty in being clear about his personal development priorities. He felt that he was expected to continue with the small-scale curriculum development work he had been dealing with previously, but he was more interested in matters beyond his own classroom teaching and even beyond the science department. The RAP group provided Andrew with a forum within which he could explore his professional values and ideas about the school. He was concerned about what a number of colleagues thought to be high levels of pupil disaffection and low standards of pupil behaviour in the school; he believed that the selective system in Kent had led to low levels of expectation and a lack of respect for students. The school had a wide ability intake but, at the end of Year 8, the top 25 per cent of the ability range was selected for the grammar school; in Andrew’s view, this had a demoralizing effect on the majority of the students, who were not selected and remained at the school.

Andrew had read about ‘student councils’ in the TES (Times Educational Supplement) and had begun to think about the impact that such an innovation

-94-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Teacher-led School Improvement
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Illustrations vii
  • Acknowledgements ix
  • Abbreviations xi
  • Introduction 1
  • 1 - School Improvement 5
  • 2 - Beyond Staff Development 14
  • 3 - Establishing School—university Partnerships for School Improvement 28
  • 4 - Reflective Action Planning 42
  • 5 - Reflections on Collaborative Inquiry 66
  • 6 - Working with the Model 81
  • 7 - The Teacher as Change Agent 94
  • 8 - Developing Teacher Professionalism Through School-Based Inquiry 108
  • 9 - Developing Teacher Professionalism Through Networking 123
  • 10 - Teachers ‘making a Difference’ 139
  • Conclusion 154
  • References 160
  • The Authors 168
  • Index 169
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 172

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.