The Northridge Earthquake: Vulnerability and Disaster

By Robert Bolin; Lois Stanford | Go to book overview

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

The research reported here was conducted with the generous support of the National Science Foundation under grant number CMS-9415721, with the two authors as co-principal investigators. However, all findings and recommendations are solely those of the authors and do not necessarily represent the views of NSF. Thanks is offered William A. Anderson, our Project Manager at NSF for his continued support of our modest research activities. Part of this research was conducted with a Research Experience for Undergraduates grant from NSF which allowed us to take two of our top undergraduate students, Allison Crist and Nicole Ordway, into the field to assist in data gathering and processing. Author Bolin would like to thank Dean Wendy Wilkins of the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences, Arizona State University and Robert Snow, Chair of its Department of Sociology for providing him with sabbatical support during 1996, a place to work while initial analysis and writing was completed, and, more recently, a new professorship in that department.

Field research of the type reported on here is dependent on the willingness of people to tell their stories and to answer what must seem like an endless series of questions. We would like to thank all the people at our research sites who generously gave of their time to help us in understanding the Northridge earthquake from local perspectives. Disaster research is intrusive, yet even in the midst of very busy schedules and disrupted lives, our respondents shared their experiences, giving us important insights into their lives in the face of disaster. Among the disaster professionals interviewed, Karma Hackney of the California Office of Emergency Services, deserves special recognition for being generous of her time in providing information and perspectives on managing assistance programs after a large urban disaster. Fred Messick and Andy Petrow were also very helpful in providing documents, maps, and data. Of the many in local government agencies and NGOs who assisted us, we especially thank Kenny Aragon, Bob Benedetto, Adele McPherson, Priscilla Nielsen, Susan Van Abel, Polly Bee, Beth Ferndino, Al Gaitan, Rory Maas, Virgil Nelson, Emigdio Cordova, and Jesse Ornellas. Our graduate assistant Martina Jackson provided important assistance in the conduct of the field research and in segments of the analysis. Figures 1.1, 3.1, and 4.1 were prepared by Michael Ohnersorgen, Department of Anthropology, Arizona State University. Figures 1.2, 3.2, and 3.5 were prepared by Cherie Moritz at the Arizona State University Geographic Information Systems Laboratory.

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The Northridge Earthquake: Vulnerability and Disaster
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Contents vii
  • Contents viii
  • Preface ix
  • Acknowledgements xi
  • 1 - A Common Disaster 1
  • 2 - Perspectives on Disasters 27
  • 3 - Situating the Northridge Earthquake 64
  • 4 - Situating the Communities and the Research 105
  • 5 - Responding to Northridge 130
  • 6 - Restructuring After Northridge 185
  • Notes 217
  • 7 - Vulnerability, Sustainability, and Social Change 218
  • References 238
  • Name Index 256
  • Subject Index 261
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