The Political Economy of Transition: Coming to Grips with History and Methodology

By Jozef M.Van Brabant | Go to book overview

Part I


HISTORY, STARTING CONDITIONS, AND TRANSFORMATION TASKS

Except at the creation or in the laboratory, the remit of policy making is rarely the quintessential tabula rasa permitting virtually any option to be carried out upon simple choice. The Olympian heights of economic theory are far removed from the world in which economic agents must make decisions, are compelled to reveal their options and preferences fairly quickly, and normally have to justify their choices and actions. When democratic circumstances do not prevail but policy makers aim precisely at eliciting the emergence of such a pluralistic polity, a window for “extraordinary politics,” as Leszek Balcerowicz (1993, 1994), the architect of the Polish shock therapy, termed it, may open. By its very nature this has a rather confined time dimension, perhaps up to twelve months.

This window of opportunity certainly applies to the transition economies that form the main subject of this inquiry. It is also valid mutatis mutandis for the economies that have thus far eschewed political transformations paralleling those experienced in the eastern part of Europe. Variations across countries and over time, as a rule, derive from the differentia specified of these societies. That is to say, some of the “national” features are more deeply rooted in the history (to be defined) of each of these countries. Inasmuch as managing the transition can realistically be envisaged only in a concrete setting, it is important to be clear about the main starting conditions for effectuating the envisioned societal turnaround. Some will be short-lived, and they should be of concern only if they could inhibit transformation managers from holding on to their precepts on what needs to be done. Very often, such concrete circumstances prevent even the implementation of the “optimal course” of transformation designed by the best economic and legal brains. Others are much more deeply engrained, and so there will not only be hysteresis in the true sense of that term in physics, but also a lingering effect of the past in shaping the future. Path dependency is unavoidable.

-17-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Political Economy of Transition: Coming to Grips with History and Methodology
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 560

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.