Technophobia: The Psychological Impact of Information Technology

By Mark J. Brosnan | Go to book overview

Chapter 4

Technophobia and cognitive style/ spatial ability

Is technophobia indicative of a lack of ability?

Women’s rejection of computing, far from being an irrational ‘computerphobia’, is a rational ‘computer reticence’.

(Sherry Turkle, 1988)


INTRODUCTION

Turkle’s quote above underlines her assumptions that masculinization of computers occurs, not at the social level advocated in previous chapters, but at the cognitive level. The conclusions drawn from the last chapter imply that increased SE may affect the use of analytical strategies. Strategy selection has been argued to be a major determinant of successful human computer interaction (HCI). Unsuccessful HCI has obvious implications for both technophobia and the expectations of success discussed in the previous chapter. Cognitive style, then, is the focus of this chapter. In her book The Second Self (1984), Sherry Turkle argues that sex differences in technophobia are due to sex differences in strategy selection, with males inherently preferring more analytical strategies. As males tend to program computers, male analytic strategies are inherent within computing. Consequently, females have to conform to a different style of thought to their preferred style, which in turn is anxiety producing. This implicit ‘maleness’ is in addition to more explicit male-directed programming. Recreational and software programs, for example, reflect the gender biases and stereotypes of their designers, and studies reveal that educational software is generally designed to appeal to males—even when designers are aware of gender differences (Huff and Cooper, 1987). As discussed previously, far more computer games, specifically, are aimed at boys rather than girls (Chen, 1986; Wilder et al., 1985).

-79-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Technophobia: The Psychological Impact of Information Technology
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Illustrations ix
  • Acknowledgements x
  • Author’s Note xi
  • Prologue xii
  • Introduction 1
  • Chapter 1 - Technophobia 10
  • Chapter 2 - Technophobia and Gender 37
  • Chapter 3 - Technophobia and Self Efficacy 60
  • Chapter 4 - Technophobia and Cognitive Style/ Spatial Ability 79
  • Chapter 5 - Psychological Models of Technophobia 102
  • Chapter 6 - Technophobia in Education 123
  • Chapter 7 - Technophobia in Management 136
  • Chapter 8 - Technophobia—a Broader Perspective 147
  • Chapter 9 - Technophobia Reduction Programme 158
  • Conclusions 169
  • Epilogue 174
  • References 175
  • Index 208
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 220

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.