Coerced and Free Migration: Global Perspectives

By David Eltis | Go to book overview

8
Asian Contract and Free
Migrations to the Americas
WALTON LOOK LAI

ASIAN MIGRATIONS to the Americas in the nineteenth century intersect with a number of overlapping modern themes. These include the global immigration and redistribution of labor in the industrial age, in which Asians of all groups were a new and important element; the varieties of transition from slavery to free labor in the Americas, to some of which Asian indentured labor became relevant; the evolution of different kinds of coercive labor systems in the nineteenth century; the post-1840 expansion of Asian diasporal communities beyond traditional historical and geographical frameworks; and finally, the evolution of multicultural societies in the modern age, in the agrarian periphery as well as in the advanced industrial metropolis. 1

Though overseas migration within the Southeast Asian region was centuries old for both China and India, it was the expansion of the global economy in the age of industrialization and imperialism which laid the foundation for the large migratory movements of labor from these countries to many labor-scarce regions in the colonial (and formerly colonial) periphery of the expanding Atlantic world system. The economist W. Arthur Lewis spoke of late nineteenthcentury global development as being promoted by two vast streams of international migration, 50 million people leaving Europe for the temperate settlements, 13 million of whom went to the new countries of temperate settlement (Canada, Argentina, Chile, Australia, New Zealand, and South Africa), and another 50 million people leaving India and China to work in the tropics on plantations, in mines, and in construction projects. 2 The actual numbers involved in this second stream have always been a matter of ambiguity, as has indeed the regime under which they worked. 3 The reason for this am

-229-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Coerced and Free Migration: Global Perspectives
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 447

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.