Political Legitimacy and Housing: Stakeholding in Singapore

By Chua Beng-Huat | Go to book overview

Notes

INTRODUCTION
1
There are now several accounts of the success story of Singapore. Most notable are Drysdale (1984), Rodan (1989) and Sandhu and Wheatley (1989).

1PUBLIC-HOUSING POLICIES COMPARED
1
Since 1991, each public housing estate is managed by a committee headed by an elected Member of Parliament and his appointees. Such committees have been given the rather grandiose name of ‘town councils’ (Ooi, 1990).
2
It has been suggested that the primary goals of this programme were job creation in order to alleviate unemployment and slum clearance and that provision of housing for the poor was secondary.
3
It should be noted that the issue is one of maintaining a reasonable mix of income groups, because exclusive provision for those who can afford to rent, as in the case of West Germany (Kratke, 1989), has the same result of leaving out the lowest-income groups from access to decent housing.
4
For discussion of excessive gains by private investors derived from tax incentives in providing low-cost housing, see Weicher (1982:41-3).
5
These factors included high rates of inflation, rising marginal tax rates, and favourable tax treatment of interest payments, property taxes and imputed rents (Kain, 1983:146).
6
There is some disagreement regarding the extent to which this conversion has affected the rental housing stock and the position of the rents; see Kain (1983:142-4).
7
Some of these elements are less explicitly spelt out by Szelenyi’s suggestions (1983) for modification of the socialist housing programmes.
8
There is in principle or in practice no reason why income ceilings should not be removed completely. Doing so would only add a very small fraction to the demand for flats, which the HDB can easily meet. Possible reasons for not doing so are (a) to protect the private housing market where very substantial amounts of capital have been invested by Singaporeans themselves, and (b)

-168-

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Political Legitimacy and Housing: Stakeholding in Singapore
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents ix
  • Figures x
  • Preface xi
  • Acknowledgements xv
  • Introduction 1
  • Chapter 1 - Public-Housing Policies Compared 12
  • Chapter 2 - From City to Nation 27
  • Chapter 3 - Resettling a Chinese Village 51
  • Chapter 4 - Modernism and the Vernacular 70
  • Chapter 5 - Adjusting Religious Practices to Different House-Forms 90
  • Chapter 6 - A Practicable Concept of Community in a High-Rise Housing Environment 113
  • Chapter 7 - Public Housing and Political Legitimacy 124
  • Chapter 8 - Nostalgia for the Kampung 152
  • Notes 168
  • References 174
  • Author Index 181
  • Subject Index 184
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