Facing Fascism: The Conservative Party and the European Dictators, 1935-1940

By N. J. Crowson | Go to book overview

6

The prosecution of the war, September 1939 to May 1940

In May 1940, eight months after Britain’s declaration of war on Germany, Neville Chamberlain resigned as Prime Minister after his parliamentary majority of 281 was reduced to eighty-one in a vote of confidence on his government’s prosecution of the Norway military campaign. In fact the Norway debate was more than simply a deliberation on the failure of one military campaign; it was seen as a referendum on the Chamberlain government’s whole war conduct. It proved to be the first twentieth-century example of a majority administration being forced out of office by a parliamentary vote. This chapter will consider how the Conservative party reacted to the Chamberlain government’s handling of the war effort between September 1939 and the German invasion of France in May 1940. An examination will be made of the mechanisms available within parliament and the party for its membership to communicate their concerns to the leadership. This period, which became known as the ‘phoney war’ or the ‘strange war’ because of the failure of allied forces to engage the axis enemy actively, was to prove crucial in the fall of the Chamberlain government. 1 After an initial show of unity immediately following the declaration of war (because of their belief that it was their patriotic duty), many Conservatives soon expressed disquiet with the prosecution of the war. This chapter analyses those areas of policy that caused Conservative disgruntlement, and asks to what extent Chamberlain’s fall from office was inevitable.


MAINTAINING NORMALITY?

War had immediate implications for the continued functioning of the party organisation and the pursuit of party politics. Hacking, the party chairman, sent a circular to all constituency associations requesting on behalf of the authorities that they close down for the

-168-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Facing Fascism: The Conservative Party and the European Dictators, 1935-1940
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 270

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.