Social Economy: The Logic of Capitalist Development

By Clark Everling | Go to book overview
Save to active project

1

A THEORY OF THE SOCIAL ECONOMY

The whole question of socialism, and a central one for Marx, is the question of its origins. From where and under what circumstances does socialism arise? Does it arise through the processes of capitalism itself, and, if so, how? Or is capitalism entirely antithetical to socialism so that we must think of socialism as proceeding only through the creation of social relations entirely alien and opposed to capitalism, outside of and subsequent to capitalism? If we affirm this second approach, as has most of Western Marxism during the twentieth century, then socialism today, in this era of global capitalism, must seem very far away indeed (Eagleton 1991:146). 1 Yet if we take the first approach, then where and how can socialism come to exist? How can the politics for socialist democracy, which Marx envisioned in his writings, be said to have any foundations within the present processes of capitalist development?

I argue throughout this book that socialism is, among other things, an objective development of capitalism. That is, as capitalism develops it creates the premises for social reproduction which are also the bases for a socialist and democratic construction of society. Because capitalist private appropriation is more and more antithetical to social requirements, even as it extends them in its own reproduction, capitalism makes socialism both possible and necessary. Socialism requires the reproduction of social relations according to developed human requirements in their own right, independent of the requirements of private appropriation. The creation of common social requirements is the promise of capitalism, what Marx called its “historical task” (Marx 1986b, vol. III: 250). At the same time, however, because of its opposition to the very social requirements which its own concentration and centralization presuppose, capitalism becomes more reliant upon social exclusion and repression for its reproduction. This, in its most essential form, is capitalism’s threat to the human future. In this regard, the tasks of building socialism require a recognition that we, as human beings, are the creators of both sides of this opposition. The increasingly social character of

-1-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Social Economy: The Logic of Capitalist Development
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

While we understand printed pages are helpful to our users, this limitation is necessary to help protect our publishers' copyrighted material and prevent its unlawful distribution. We are sorry for any inconvenience.
Full screen
/ 200

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.