Local Elections in Britain

By Colin Rallings; Michael Thrasher | Go to book overview

8

Major parties and local elections

INTRODUCTION

When the electoral pendulum swung between just two parties the fate of one tended to be a mirror image of the other: when Conservative fortunes rose those of Labour fell and when the electoral mood swung against the Conservatives, Labour was the beneficiary. As a third major political force entered the electoral fray, and met with some partial successes, this certainty started to evaporate. Given more choices the electorate has expressed its preferences or its protests in different ways in different places at different times. The erosion of Conservative support has neither been uniform nor in one direction. In some areas the party has resisted electoral hostility better than in others. Where it has lost ground Labour has sometimes been the prime beneficiary, elsewhere it has been the Liberal Democrats or the Scottish Nationalists. The outcome of local elections, therefore, has often been unpredictable.

In this chapter we wish to chart the ebb and flow of electoral fortune for each of three main political parties—Conservative, Labour and the Liberal Democrats and their various previous incarnations. In the following chapter we turn our attention to the performance of the Nationalist parties and other political groups which have played a greater or lesser role in local electoral politics during the past two decades. Specifically, our concern is to describe the successes and failures for each party, the areas and type of local authority where it has made the biggest impact and what factors appear relevant in its local electoral development.

The Conservative party will be discussed first since for many years it was the most dominant. For that reason its recent failures have been dramatic and have had a profound effect upon the map of local authority control. Next, the focus switches to Labour, which has seen its fortunes ebb and flow, but is currently enjoying perhaps its best phase in terms of local government representation. For each of these parties local electoral performance has frequently been related to its control or not of national government. The fact that there is regularly a local protest vote against the party in power at Westminster is well known, though in recent years even this picture has altered as more and more voters appear

-121-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Local Elections in Britain
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 232

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.