Sidney: The Critical Heritage

By Martin Garrett | Go to book overview

Zelmane hee could not take him to bee; her sexe and this change, at their first birth destroy’d these apprehensions. Pyrocles, his heart swore he was not, whose youth and beauty God wot were no fit liverie for such atchievements as the world fam’d him for. Thus a while hee continued, troubled with the uncertain tie of conjectures, untill Pyrocles (happily conceiving the cause of his amazement) stopt his further admiration, by letting him know, that the then Zelmane was the now Pyrocles. Whereat Amphialus, as one newly wak’t out of a dreame, cryed out, Anaxius: Anaxius, said hee, ’twas the Prince of Macedon (not a woman) overcame thee. Wheresoever thy soule be, let it keep this time festivall, as the birth day of thy glory. And so after mutuall embraces, together with the rest of the Princes, they entred the Palace.


47.

Upon Sydneis Arcadia

c. 1625-50

This poem is included in an anonymously compiled manuscript miscellany which also contains (f. 45v; printed in Ringler, p. 431) a paraphrase of Certain Sonnets 25.30-4. For similar examples of the association of Arcadia with lovers and similar use of some of the characters, see Introduction, pp. 17, 21-2.


‘Upon Sydneis Arcadia sent to his m.rs’, British Library, MS Add. 10309, ff. 86v-87v. (‘Thee’ below replaces the ‘the’ used throughout in the original.)


Goe happie booke, the fates to workes thee blisse,
Doe match thy worth, with this rare happinesse;
That thou the most delicious booke that is
unto the fayrest soule should have accesse.
Henceforth be stil’d a peereles happy booke,
(Thy dainty happinesse if she doe brooke).

-217-

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