Sidney: The Critical Heritage

By Martin Garrett | Go to book overview

being a Man was revealed) I thank you for this care of me. Philanax finding by their speech that they were of near Acquaintance, began to Examin them apart; but such resolution he found in them, that he could learn no farther of them than it pleased them to declare. So he thought that it would be most fit to put them both in one Place, and for that purpose, gave them both unto the Noble man Simpathus, who before had the Custody of Pyrocles.


71.

D. Stanley

1725

The list of subscribers to this re-writing of Arcadia includes Sir Hans Sloane. Since Sloane’s daughter Sarah had married in 1719 George Stanley of Paultons (DNB, s.nn. ‘Sir Hans Sloane’ and ‘Hans Stanley’), ‘D.’—Dorothy?—Stanley was perhaps a relation of his. (I have been unable to trace the Edward and Hester Stanley also listed as subscribers.)

The parting of Argalus and Parthenia, in the extract chosen here, typifies Stanley’s style and attitudes. Speech from Arcadia (NA, pp. 372-3) is expanded, inflated and made generally to conform to the standards of decorum established by Sentimentalism as exemplified in the tragedies of Nicholas Rowe. ‘Mine you are’ becomes ‘you’ve given your self to me by the most solemn Tyes’; ‘your blood must be bled by Parthenia’ becomes ‘nor can your breast be pierced, but through her Heart’. Correct sentiment is to be spelt out: additions include the reference to ‘The righteous Heavens’ and their justice. The narrator, too, sometimes provides a moral lead: ‘the tyranny of honour’ in the original becomes ‘mistaken Notions of tyrannick Honour’, and in Stanley’s concluding sentence, also given below, happy closure substitutes for the sense of future possibilities and unanswered questions at the end of Arcadia. The eclogues are simply omitted: ‘I have the opinion of most of my Subscribers for it’ (Preface, sig. bv).

-272-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Sidney: The Critical Heritage
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 366

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.