World Trade after the Uruguay Round: Prospects and Policy Options for the Twenty-First Century

By Harald Sander; András Inotai | Go to book overview
Save to active project

5

THE SURVIVAL OF SPECIAL PREFERENCES UNDER THE LOMÉ CONVENTION

The ACP countries and the European Union after the Uruguay Round 1

Adrian Hewitt and Antonique Koning

Former colonies of the member states of the European Union (EU) have enjoyed preferential access into the EU market since the creation of the European Economic Community in 1957. Moreover, since 1975 successive Lomé Conventions have committed this specially privileged group of countries which now consists of seventy African, Caribbean and Pacific (ACP) states, and the European Union to achieving a ‘better balance of trade’. Although that is a somewhat hazy concept, if one were to attempt to target the overall merchandise trade balance of seventy developing and now fifteen EU states combined, the thinking behind the concept as originally set out in the mid-1970s is at least clear. It aims at promoting and diversifying ACP exports to the EU market and at decreasing ACP dependency on primary exports. Since the Lomé Convention arrangements are hybrid, it was hoped to achieve this by means of aid provisions and non-reciprocal trade preferences. Nowadays, one may wonder what the meaning of such a commitment is in an international trade environment which is increasingly oriented towards trade liberalisation—as has been clearly marked by the completion of the Uruguay Round—rather than to preferential and discriminatory trade agreements such as the Lomé Convention.

In this chapter an analysis is made of the effects of the Uruguay Round on ACP exports to the European Union and other markets, with a special emphasis on the effects on their preferential access to these former markets. In order to understand these effects better, however, we start with an assessment of the Lomé trade preferences and their effects on ACP trade performance. In the final part of this chapter some conclusions will be drawn on the prospects and challenges which ACP exporters face under the regime of the new World Trade Organization (WTO).

-89-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
Loading One moment ...
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
World Trade after the Uruguay Round: Prospects and Policy Options for the Twenty-First Century
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

While we understand printed pages are helpful to our users, this limitation is necessary to help protect our publishers' copyrighted material and prevent its unlawful distribution. We are sorry for any inconvenience.
Full screen
/ 200

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.

Are you sure you want to delete this highlight?