Towards a 'Natural' Narratology

By Monika Fludernik | Go to book overview

3

From the oral to the written

Narrative structure before the novel

This chapter is designed to provide a transition between the discussion of narrative experientiality in oral narrative in Chapter 2 and the presentation, in Chapter 4, of experiential modes of narration from the realist to the Modernist novel. The chapter will therefore trace a complex set of developments on several levels of analysis.

To start with, the texts that will be discussed (medieval and early modern prose, verse narrative) are written texts, some of which, however, are considered to have been transmitted orally before getting fixed in a written mould. The chapter therefore traces a development from what are traditionally believed to be oral kinds of narrative to texts allegedly modelled on the oral pattern to texts which have become emancipated from the oral tradition and have initiated a new (written) mode of écriture.

Second, the literature treated in this chapter comprises a great variety of genres. No argument is here proffered that would claim a direct development from one genre into another, but an interdependence and mutual fertilization will be acknowledged to exist between some generic traditions. No complete account can be provided in the space of one brief chapter, so that whatever I have to say in these pages will necessarily need to remain sketchy and impressionistic. 1 The situation in Middle English literature is complicated by a number of frame conditions which in their intricacy exceed even the complexities of the French circumstances. For instance, the existence has to be noted of an Old English tradition (both prose and verse) which ‘breaks off’ at the time of the Norman conquest and results in a resumption of Latin writing (in prose) even for those genres where the vernacular had already been in use before, as for instance in the Anglo-Saxon chronicles (Tristram 1988). Middle English ‘resumes’ its formal circulation only in the thirteenth century, and it does so in both verse and prose, although prose is present less generally and does not really become widely used for narrative until the fifteenth century.

The comparison of narrative structure in prose and verse genres and texts is a further crucial aspect to be dealt with in these pages. In my opinion, in the formal analysis the development of prose has to be strictly

-92-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Towards a 'Natural' Narratology
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Preface xi
  • Acknowledgements xv
  • Prologue in the Wilderness 1
  • 1 - Towards a ‘natural’ Narratology 12
  • 2 - Natural Narrative and Other Oral Modes 53
  • 3 - From the Oral to the Written 92
  • 4 - The Realist Paradigm 129
  • 5 - Reflectorization and Figuralization 178
  • 6 - Virgin Territories 222
  • 7 - Games with Tellers, Telling and Told 269
  • 8 - Natural Narratology 311
  • In Lieu of an Epilogue 376
  • Notes 379
  • References 407
  • Author Index 443
  • Subject Index 448
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 454

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.