Towards a 'Natural' Narratology

By Monika Fludernik | Go to book overview
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Notes

PROLOGUE IN THE WILDERNESS
1
See the debate between Searle and Derrida (Derrida 1977a, 1977b; Searle 1977).
2
Compare Fludernik (1993a: Chapter 8).
3
Greenblatt’s pattern mirrors other famous journeys into the wilderness’ heart of darkness which are characterized by an intensification of linguistic recuperation but are eventually confronted with speechless horror, or the very horror of inarticulation. The heart of darkness is the site at which language is maximally deployed but fails to signify, provoking speechless terror.
4
Compare the dictum: ‘Realism, whose only definition is that it intends to avoid the question of reality’ (Jean-François Lyotard, The Postmodern Condition; quoted Kearns 1992:857).
5
In the original: ‘Le simulacre n’est jamais ce qui cache la vérité—c’est la vérité qui cache qu’il n’y en a pas./Le simulacre est vrai (L’Ecctésiaste)’ (Baudrillard 1981:9).

1 TOWARDS A ‘NATURAL’ NARRATOLOGY
1
Constructivism, a sociological methodology, is linked with the name of Alfred Schütz. See, for instance, Schütz (1960) or Schütz and Luckmann (1975). For recent literary applications see also S. Schmidt (1989, 1992) and von Glasersfeld (1989).
2
G. Prince (1995:80). See G. Prince (1982:145-61) for his definition of narrativity as a scalar concept of what makes good narrative. In his Dictionary of Narratology Prince’s definition of narrativity is, however, closer to my own understanding of the term, which appears to be shared by other critics: ‘The set of properties characterizing NARRATIVE and distinguishing it from nonnarrative; the formal and contextual features making a narrative more or less narrative, as it were’ (1987:64; s.v. narrativity).
3
The reference is to professional storytellers recounting traditional tales, but not epic poems (i.e. oral poetry). For Indian equivalents see Tedlock (1983). Traditions of oral folk tales are also widespread in Ghana (Anthony Appiah, personal communication). Materials such as the ones Tedlock presents have been incorporated into literary narrative, as for instance in the work of Leslie Silko. The practice of communal oral storytelling is no doubt fairly general in oral cultures. It is, however, frequently impossible for me to distinguish between the epic genre of oral poetry and the storytelling of the folk tale kind when I do not have very clear information about the linguistic make-up of these orally produced texts. Thus, for languages with which I am not familiar

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