Feminism and Contemporary Art: The Revolutionary Power of Women's Laughter

By Jo Anna Isaak | Go to book overview

LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS
1.1 Nancy Spero, Codex Artaud XXVI, 1972 22
1.2 Nancy Spero, Sheela and Wilma (detail), 1985 25
1.3 Nancy Spero, Let the Priests Tremble (detail), 1984 26
1.4 Nancy Spero, Dancing Figure, 1984 28
1.5 Ilona Granet, No Cat Calls, 1987 34
1.6 Ilona Granet, Curb Your Animal Instinct, 1986 35
1.7 Jenny Holzer, Selections from Truisms, 1977-82 36
1.8 Jenny Holzer, The Survival Series, 1983 38
1.9 Jenny Holzer, The Survival Series, 1983 38
1.10 Barbara Kruger, Untitled (Buy me I’ll change your life), 1984 41
1.11 Barbara Kruger, Untitled (When I hear the word culture I take out my checkbook), 1985 42
1.12 Barbara Kruger, Untitled (I shop therefore I am), 1987 43
1.13 Barbara Kruger, Untitled (Your gaze hits the side of my face), 1981 45
2.1 Kathy Grove, The Other Series: After Lange, 1989-90 52
2.2 Kathy Grove, The Other Series: After Man Ray, 1989 54
2.3 Kathy Grove, The Other Series: After Matisse, 1989 56
2.4 Dotty Attie, A Violent Child (detail), 1988 63
2.5 Dotty Attie, Barred from the Studio, 1987 65
2.6 Dotty Attie, Mixed Metaphors, 1993 66
2.7 Elaine Reichek, Red Delicious, 1991 69
2.8 Elaine Reichek, Polkadot Blackfoot with Children, 1990 72
2.9 Elaine Reichek, Mandan, 1991 73
2.10 Elaine Reichek, Ten Little Indians, 1992 75
3.1 Natalya Goncharova, Planting Potatoes, 1908-09 82
3.2 Liubov Popova, Work uniform designs for actors at the Free Studio of Vsevolod Meyerhold, State Higher Theater Workshop (GVYTM), 1921 85
3.3 Varvara Stepanova, Costume designs for The Death of Tarelkin, 1922 86

-ix-

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